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Title: Biological crystal alignment using image processing.

Abstract

Crystal location and alignment to the x-ray beam is an enabling technology necessary for automation of the macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron beamlines. In a process of crystal structure determination, a small size x-ray synchrotron beam with FWHM as small as 70 {mu}m (bending magnet beamlines) and 20 {mu}m (undulator beamlines) is focused at or downstream of the crystal sample. Protein crystals used in structure determination become smaller and approach 50 {mu}m or less, and need to be precisely placed in the focused x-ray beam. At the Structural Biology Center the crystals are mounted on a goniostat, allowing precise crystal xyz positioning and rotations. One low and two high magnification cameras integrated into synchrotron beamline permit imaging of the crystal mounted on a goniostat. The crystals are held near liquid nitrogen temperatures using cryostream to control secondary radiation damage. Image processing techniques are used for automatic and precise placing of protein crystals in synchrotron beam. Here we are discussing automatic crystal centering process considered for Structure Biology Center utilizing several image processing techniques.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Institutes of Health (NIH); USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
981634
Report Number(s):
ANL/BIO/CP119194
Journal ID: 0277-786X; TRN: US1003828
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPIE Conference: Optics and Photonics; Aug. 13, 2006 - Aug. 17, 2006; San Diego, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ALIGNMENT; AUTOMATION; BENDING; BIOLOGY; CAMERAS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; IMAGE PROCESSING; MAGNETS; NITROGEN; OPTICS; POSITIONING; PROTEINS; RADIATIONS; SYNCHROTRONS

Citation Formats

Gofron, K. J., Lazarski, K., Molitsky, M., Joachimiak, A., and Biosciences Division. Biological crystal alignment using image processing.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1117/12.706125.
Gofron, K. J., Lazarski, K., Molitsky, M., Joachimiak, A., & Biosciences Division. Biological crystal alignment using image processing.. United States. doi:10.1117/12.706125.
Gofron, K. J., Lazarski, K., Molitsky, M., Joachimiak, A., and Biosciences Division. Sun . "Biological crystal alignment using image processing.". United States. doi:10.1117/12.706125.
@article{osti_981634,
title = {Biological crystal alignment using image processing.},
author = {Gofron, K. J. and Lazarski, K. and Molitsky, M. and Joachimiak, A. and Biosciences Division},
abstractNote = {Crystal location and alignment to the x-ray beam is an enabling technology necessary for automation of the macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron beamlines. In a process of crystal structure determination, a small size x-ray synchrotron beam with FWHM as small as 70 {mu}m (bending magnet beamlines) and 20 {mu}m (undulator beamlines) is focused at or downstream of the crystal sample. Protein crystals used in structure determination become smaller and approach 50 {mu}m or less, and need to be precisely placed in the focused x-ray beam. At the Structural Biology Center the crystals are mounted on a goniostat, allowing precise crystal xyz positioning and rotations. One low and two high magnification cameras integrated into synchrotron beamline permit imaging of the crystal mounted on a goniostat. The crystals are held near liquid nitrogen temperatures using cryostream to control secondary radiation damage. Image processing techniques are used for automatic and precise placing of protein crystals in synchrotron beam. Here we are discussing automatic crystal centering process considered for Structure Biology Center utilizing several image processing techniques.},
doi = {10.1117/12.706125},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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