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Title: Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

Abstract

Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to themore » conventional asphalt shingle.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Building Technologies Research and Integration Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
981415
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2005/265
BT0304020; CEBT314; TRN: US201012%%879
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ROOFS; COLOR; VENTS; CLAYS; CONCRETES; HEAT FLUX; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; BUILDINGS; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Miller, William A. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/981415.
Miller, William A. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors. United States. doi:10.2172/981415.
Miller, William A. Tue . "Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors". United States. doi:10.2172/981415. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/981415.
@article{osti_981415,
title = {Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors},
author = {Miller, William A},
abstractNote = {Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.},
doi = {10.2172/981415},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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