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Title: Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

Abstract

Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transportmore » measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
981375
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-14043
TRN: US201012%%1124
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Submitted to Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Submitted to Nano Letters
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; EXHIBITS; LAYERS; MATERIALS; PHOTOEMISSION; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACES; SYNTHESIS; TRANSPORT; TRIOCTYLPHOSPHINE SULFIDE; WIRES; MATSCI

Citation Formats

Kong, D S. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1021/nl903663a.
Kong, D S. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl903663a
Kong, D S. Wed . "Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/nl903663a. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/981375.
@article{osti_981375,
title = {Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons},
author = {Kong, D S},
abstractNote = {Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.},
doi = {10.1021/nl903663a},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/981375}, journal = {Submitted to Nano Letters},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {6}
}