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Title: Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells

Abstract

Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment ofmore » food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
979243
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; ANODES; BIOCHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND; ECONOMICS; ELECTRICITY; ELECTRODES; FOOD INDUSTRY; FOOD PROCESSING; FUEL CELLS; HYDROGEN; LIQUID FLOW; ORGANIC ACIDS; PRODUCTION; PROTONS; SACCHAROSE; SAFETY; SUBSTRATES; WASTES; WASTE WATER; ENERGY CONVERSION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; Bioelectricity; biohydrogen; bioelectrochemical cells; energy

Citation Formats

Hamilton, Choo Yieng. Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Hamilton, Choo Yieng. Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells. United States.
Hamilton, Choo Yieng. 2009. "Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_979243,
title = {Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells},
author = {Hamilton, Choo Yieng},
abstractNote = {Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment of food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 1
}

Book:
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  • The volumes contain 171 papers or abstracts of papers presented at the meeting; 114 of the papers are indexed separately. The papers are grouped under the following general topics: solar energy, livestock production, biomass energy, crop production, and food processing. Specific subjects covered include solar grain drying, crop residue combustion, space heating and ventilation of farm buildings, wind energy for agricultural applications, solar ponds, production of ethanol and methane for corn stover, anaerobic digestion of animal wastes, biogas generation, irrigation energy requirements, greenhouses, energy conservation in food processing, alternative fuel sources, and others.
  • This report seeks to make a comprehensive examination of the sources and inputs of energy used in bringing to homes the food items used. A listing is made of common food items and the amounts of energy needed to produce, transport, process, and market them. A broad breakdown of how the energy is distributed in the agricultural and food-processing sectors is given, showing graphically that more than a quarter of this energy is allocated to packaging and marketing. More-detailed energy accounting in the report makes it possible to compare energy intensities of a wide range of food products and pointsmore » to several practices that should be encouraged where possible: increased home gardening and fruit growing; shift to vegetable from animal protein, especially from grain-fed cattle; reduced use of processed foods, especially frozen specialties; avoidance of nonreturnable beverage containers; and increased purchase of bulk and unpackaged foods.« less
  • An iron-bearing material deriving from surface finishing operations in the manufacturing of cast-iron components demonstrates considerable potential as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of heavy metals in aqueous waste streams. The availability of the residual iron material renders recycling and use of the material in treatment applications for metal-bearing wastewaters a potentially innovative, and cost-effective venture. Furthermore, a portion of he material exists in granular sizes that may be used in fixed bed applications. The principal aims of the present work, however, are to: (1) experimentally investigate the adsorption capacity and rate of heavy metals onto the iron sorbent inmore » batch systems, and (2) to examine the extent to which existing mathematical models for adsorption equilibria and kinetics can quantify the experimental data and thereby serve as an aid in understanding experimental phenomena and potentially as a design tool.« less
  • Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme,more » and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.« less
  • The book describes the market structure and energy consumption in the food products industries (SIC-20). The study identifies major energy-using processes and identifies opportunities for more efficient use of energy within these processes.