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Title: Analysis of Transient Heating of Phosphor Coatings

Abstract

This work examines how faithfully a layer of thermographic phosphor responds to a rapidly changing temperature of the substrate to which it is attached. A simple model is presented and applied to the specific situation of a ramp heating pulse of 200 C in 15 ms. The model predicts a time lag in temperature of about 6 ms for a 100 micron layer for a phosphor of thermal conductivity equivalent to glass. A 20 micron layer exhibits a 1/3 ms time lag. Experimental data for a rapidly heated nichrome wire provides supporting evidence that thin phosphor layers can follow such temperature changes on this time scale.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. Vanderbilt University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
978754
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ISA Expo 2007, Houston, TX, USA, 20071001, 20071004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COATINGS; GLASS; HEATING; NICHROME; PHOSPHORS; SUBSTRATES; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; TRANSIENTS; thermographic phosphors

Citation Formats

Allison, Stephen W, and Walker, D. Greg. Analysis of Transient Heating of Phosphor Coatings. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Allison, Stephen W, & Walker, D. Greg. Analysis of Transient Heating of Phosphor Coatings. United States.
Allison, Stephen W, and Walker, D. Greg. Mon . "Analysis of Transient Heating of Phosphor Coatings". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_978754,
title = {Analysis of Transient Heating of Phosphor Coatings},
author = {Allison, Stephen W and Walker, D. Greg},
abstractNote = {This work examines how faithfully a layer of thermographic phosphor responds to a rapidly changing temperature of the substrate to which it is attached. A simple model is presented and applied to the specific situation of a ramp heating pulse of 200 C in 15 ms. The model predicts a time lag in temperature of about 6 ms for a 100 micron layer for a phosphor of thermal conductivity equivalent to glass. A 20 micron layer exhibits a 1/3 ms time lag. Experimental data for a rapidly heated nichrome wire provides supporting evidence that thin phosphor layers can follow such temperature changes on this time scale.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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