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Title: A Critical Overview of Recent Approaches to Improved Thermoelectric Materials

Abstract

Thermoelectric devices can convert heat into useful electricity with no moving parts. Considerable progress has been made in improving the efficiency of these devices over the past 15 years. The key ideas responsible for most of this progress will be examined using specific examples. Recent improvements in thermoelectric efficiency appear to be dominated by a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. This reduction is accomplished by the careful introduction of 0.1 to 5 nm sized "objects" that effectively scatter acoustic phonons without significantly affecting electronic transport. Future research directions will be discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
978745
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ACOUSTICS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRICITY; PHONONS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Sales, Brian C. A Critical Overview of Recent Approaches to Improved Thermoelectric Materials. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7402.2007.02143.x.
Sales, Brian C. A Critical Overview of Recent Approaches to Improved Thermoelectric Materials. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7402.2007.02143.x.
Sales, Brian C. Mon . "A Critical Overview of Recent Approaches to Improved Thermoelectric Materials". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7402.2007.02143.x.
@article{osti_978745,
title = {A Critical Overview of Recent Approaches to Improved Thermoelectric Materials},
author = {Sales, Brian C},
abstractNote = {Thermoelectric devices can convert heat into useful electricity with no moving parts. Considerable progress has been made in improving the efficiency of these devices over the past 15 years. The key ideas responsible for most of this progress will be examined using specific examples. Recent improvements in thermoelectric efficiency appear to be dominated by a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. This reduction is accomplished by the careful introduction of 0.1 to 5 nm sized "objects" that effectively scatter acoustic phonons without significantly affecting electronic transport. Future research directions will be discussed.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1744-7402.2007.02143.x},
journal = {International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology},
number = 4,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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