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Title: Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?

Abstract

Oil independence has been a goal of U.S. energy policy for the past 30 years yet has never been rigorously defined. A rigorous, measurable definition is proposed: to reduce the costs of oil dependence to less than 1% of GDP in the next 20 to 25 years, with 95% probability. A simulation model incorporating the possibility of future oil supply disruptions and other sources of uncertainty is used to test whether two alternative energy policy strategies, Business as Usual and an interpretation of the strategy proposed by the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP), can achieve oil independence for the United States. Business as Usual does not produce oil independence. The augmented NCEP strategy comes close to achieving oil independence for the U.S. economy within the next 20-25 years but more is needed. The success of the strategy appears to be robust regardless of how the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) responds to it. Expected annual savings are estimated to exceed $250 billion per year by 2030.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. ORNL
  2. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis
  3. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
978740
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Transportation Research Board's 86th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, USA, 20070122, 20070125
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; BUSINESS; ENERGY POLICY; OPEC; PETROLEUM; PROBABILITY; SIMULATION; SUPPLY DISRUPTION

Citation Formats

Greene, David L, Leiby, Paul Newsome, Patterson, Philip D, Plotkin, Steven E, and Singh, Margaret K. Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Greene, David L, Leiby, Paul Newsome, Patterson, Philip D, Plotkin, Steven E, & Singh, Margaret K. Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?. United States.
Greene, David L, Leiby, Paul Newsome, Patterson, Philip D, Plotkin, Steven E, and Singh, Margaret K. Mon . "Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_978740,
title = {Oil Independence: Achievable National Goal or Empty Slogan?},
author = {Greene, David L and Leiby, Paul Newsome and Patterson, Philip D and Plotkin, Steven E and Singh, Margaret K},
abstractNote = {Oil independence has been a goal of U.S. energy policy for the past 30 years yet has never been rigorously defined. A rigorous, measurable definition is proposed: to reduce the costs of oil dependence to less than 1% of GDP in the next 20 to 25 years, with 95% probability. A simulation model incorporating the possibility of future oil supply disruptions and other sources of uncertainty is used to test whether two alternative energy policy strategies, Business as Usual and an interpretation of the strategy proposed by the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP), can achieve oil independence for the United States. Business as Usual does not produce oil independence. The augmented NCEP strategy comes close to achieving oil independence for the U.S. economy within the next 20-25 years but more is needed. The success of the strategy appears to be robust regardless of how the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) responds to it. Expected annual savings are estimated to exceed $250 billion per year by 2030.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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