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Title: WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING

Abstract

High-pressure die casting (HPDC) involves the filling of a cavity with the molten metal through a thin gate. High gate velocities yield jet break-up and atomization phenomena. In order to improve the quality of magnesium parts, the mold filling pattern, including atomization phenomena, needs to be understood. The goal of this study was to obtain experimental data on jet break-up characteristics for conditions similar to that of magnesium HPDC, and measure the droplet velocity and size distribution. A scale analysis is first presented in order to identify appropriate analogue for liquid magnesium alloys. Based on the scale analysis warm water was chosen as a suitable analogue and different nozzles were manufactured. A 2-D component phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and 2-D component particle image velocimetry (PIV) were then used to obtain fine particle diameter and velocity distributions in 2-D plane.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
978149
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: TMS 2006, San Antonio, TX, USA, 20060312, 20060316
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ATOMIZATION; CASTING; DISTRIBUTION; MAGNESIUM; MAGNESIUM ALLOYS; NOZZLES; SCALE MODELS; VELOCITY; WATER

Citation Formats

Sabau, Adrian S. WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Sabau, Adrian S. WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING. United States.
Sabau, Adrian S. Sun . "WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_978149,
title = {WARM WATER SCALE MODEL EXPERIMENTS FOR MAGNESIUM DIE CASTING},
author = {Sabau, Adrian S},
abstractNote = {High-pressure die casting (HPDC) involves the filling of a cavity with the molten metal through a thin gate. High gate velocities yield jet break-up and atomization phenomena. In order to improve the quality of magnesium parts, the mold filling pattern, including atomization phenomena, needs to be understood. The goal of this study was to obtain experimental data on jet break-up characteristics for conditions similar to that of magnesium HPDC, and measure the droplet velocity and size distribution. A scale analysis is first presented in order to identify appropriate analogue for liquid magnesium alloys. Based on the scale analysis warm water was chosen as a suitable analogue and different nozzles were manufactured. A 2-D component phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and 2-D component particle image velocimetry (PIV) were then used to obtain fine particle diameter and velocity distributions in 2-D plane.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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