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Title: Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface

Abstract

In this study, the authors report atomic-resolution images that illustrate the transition from a crystalline Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain across the interface into an amorphous Lu-Si-Mg-N-O glassy phase. The interface is not atomically abrupt, but is comprised of sub-nanometer-scale ordered regions that resemble a LuN-like structure. These ordered clusters bind to the prismatic surface of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains at specific low energy positions for Lu adsorption as predicted by first-principles calculations. The ordered regions are filamentary in nature, extending for at least two atomic layers into the amorphous pockets at multigrain junctions before disappearing.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
978023
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ADSORPTION; PHYSICS; ORNL

Citation Formats

Shibata, Naoya, Painter, Gayle S, Becher, Paul F, and Pennycook, Stephen J. Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2245212.
Shibata, Naoya, Painter, Gayle S, Becher, Paul F, & Pennycook, Stephen J. Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2245212.
Shibata, Naoya, Painter, Gayle S, Becher, Paul F, and Pennycook, Stephen J. Sun . "Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2245212.
@article{osti_978023,
title = {Atomic Structure of an Amorphous/Crystal Interface},
author = {Shibata, Naoya and Painter, Gayle S and Becher, Paul F and Pennycook, Stephen J},
abstractNote = {In this study, the authors report atomic-resolution images that illustrate the transition from a crystalline Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain across the interface into an amorphous Lu-Si-Mg-N-O glassy phase. The interface is not atomically abrupt, but is comprised of sub-nanometer-scale ordered regions that resemble a LuN-like structure. These ordered clusters bind to the prismatic surface of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains at specific low energy positions for Lu adsorption as predicted by first-principles calculations. The ordered regions are filamentary in nature, extending for at least two atomic layers into the amorphous pockets at multigrain junctions before disappearing.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2245212},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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