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Title: High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

Abstract

The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for anymore » strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform valid, uniaxial, dynamic compression experiments on brittle materials using the Kolsky-SHPB technique and to emphasize the limitations of this technique. Kolsky-SHPB results for several ceramic and ceramic-metal(cermet) materials of interest for armor applications have been measured and show little or no strain rate sensitivity compared to quasi-static compression results.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (William R.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
977941
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-05-0241
TRN: US201012%%827
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Submitted to: 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, Cocoa Beach, FL, January 24 – 28, 2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARMOR; CERAMICS; COMPRESSION; DEFECTS; DEFORMATION; DISLOCATIONS; DISTRIBUTION; FRACTURES; LANL; PLASTICS; POLYMERS; SENSITIVITY; SHEAR; STRAIN RATE; STRAINS; STRESSES; TESTING

Citation Formats

Blumenthal, W. R. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Blumenthal, W. R. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.. United States.
Blumenthal, W. R. Sat . "High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/977941.
@article{osti_977941,
title = {High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.},
author = {Blumenthal, W. R.},
abstractNote = {The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform valid, uniaxial, dynamic compression experiments on brittle materials using the Kolsky-SHPB technique and to emphasize the limitations of this technique. Kolsky-SHPB results for several ceramic and ceramic-metal(cermet) materials of interest for armor applications have been measured and show little or no strain rate sensitivity compared to quasi-static compression results.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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