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Title: On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.

Abstract

In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (University of Texas-Austin)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
976941
Report Number(s):
SAND2010-1480
TRN: US201009%%220
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; RUBBERS; STRAIN RATE; RESPONSE FUNCTIONS; SHOCK WAVES; WAVE PROPAGATION; ELASTICITY; LATEX; NITRILES

Citation Formats

Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/976941.
Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg. On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.. United States. doi:10.2172/976941.
Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg. Mon . "On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.". United States. doi:10.2172/976941. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/976941.
@article{osti_976941,
title = {On the response of rubbers at high strain rates.},
author = {Niemczura, Johnathan Greenberg},
abstractNote = {In this report, we examine the propagation of tensile waves of finite deformation in rubbers through experiments and analysis. Attention is focused on the propagation of one-dimensional dispersive and shock waves in strips of latex and nitrile rubber. Tensile wave propagation experiments were conducted at high strain-rates by holding one end fixed and displacing the other end at a constant velocity. A high-speed video camera was used to monitor the motion and to determine the evolution of strain and particle velocity in the rubber strips. Analysis of the response through the theory of finite waves and quantitative matching between the experimental observations and analytical predictions was used to determine an appropriate instantaneous elastic response for the rubbers. This analysis also yields the tensile shock adiabat for rubber. Dispersive waves as well as shock waves are also observed in free-retraction experiments; these are used to quantify hysteretic effects in rubber.},
doi = {10.2172/976941},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}

Technical Report:

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