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Title: Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

Abstract

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will takemore » place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science and Technology (EM-50)
OSTI Identifier:
974448
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM/10-004
TRN: US201008%%470
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIRCRAFT; ALGORITHMS; CLIMATE MODELS; CLIMATES; CLOUDS; CONDENSATES; ENERGY BALANCE; FORECASTING; MOISTURE; PHYSICS; PRECIPITATION; RADIATIONS; REMOTE SENSING; TRANSPORT; VALIDATION; WEATHER

Citation Formats

Jensen, MP, Petersen, WA, Del Genio, AD, Giangrande, SE, Heymsfield, A, Heymsfield, G, Hou, AY, Kollias, P, Orr, B, Rutledge, SA, Schwaller, MR, and Zipser, E. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.2172/974448.
Jensen, MP, Petersen, WA, Del Genio, AD, Giangrande, SE, Heymsfield, A, Heymsfield, G, Hou, AY, Kollias, P, Orr, B, Rutledge, SA, Schwaller, MR, & Zipser, E. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/974448
Jensen, MP, Petersen, WA, Del Genio, AD, Giangrande, SE, Heymsfield, A, Heymsfield, G, Hou, AY, Kollias, P, Orr, B, Rutledge, SA, Schwaller, MR, and Zipser, E. Thu . "Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/974448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/974448.
@article{osti_974448,
title = {Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)},
author = {Jensen, MP and Petersen, WA and Del Genio, AD and Giangrande, SE and Heymsfield, A and Heymsfield, G and Hou, AY and Kollias, P and Orr, B and Rutledge, SA and Schwaller, MR and Zipser, E},
abstractNote = {Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.},
doi = {10.2172/974448},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/974448}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {4}
}