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Title: Development of Multi-window ASIC for High-Flux X-Ray Inspection Systems.

Abstract

The BNL Microelectronics group has designed a series of custom ASICs in CMOS technol­ogy for use with Cadmium-Zink-Telluride (CdZnTe) radiation detectors, primarily in the field of nuclear spectroscopy. An increased demand for CdZnTe based detection systems that can operate in high flux X-ray inspection equipment makes it necessary to develop a new type of signal processing ASIC, one which can achieve moderate energy resolution at very high count rate. This work covers the development of a high-rate, low power ASIC that classifies events into one of five energy windows at rates up to 2 MHz/channel.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
974291
Report Number(s):
BNL-91093-2007
C-05-08
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

O'Connor, Paul. Development of Multi-window ASIC for High-Flux X-Ray Inspection Systems.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/974291.
O'Connor, Paul. Development of Multi-window ASIC for High-Flux X-Ray Inspection Systems.. United States. doi:10.2172/974291.
O'Connor, Paul. Thu . "Development of Multi-window ASIC for High-Flux X-Ray Inspection Systems.". United States. doi:10.2172/974291. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/974291.
@article{osti_974291,
title = {Development of Multi-window ASIC for High-Flux X-Ray Inspection Systems.},
author = {O'Connor, Paul},
abstractNote = {The BNL Microelectronics group has designed a series of custom ASICs in CMOS technol­ogy for use with Cadmium-Zink-Telluride (CdZnTe) radiation detectors, primarily in the field of nuclear spectroscopy. An increased demand for CdZnTe based detection systems that can operate in high flux X-ray inspection equipment makes it necessary to develop a new type of signal processing ASIC, one which can achieve moderate energy resolution at very high count rate. This work covers the development of a high-rate, low power ASIC that classifies events into one of five energy windows at rates up to 2 MHz/channel.},
doi = {10.2172/974291},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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