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Title: Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.

Abstract

A novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of a dedicated alignment undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning accelerator components in an x-ray free-electron laser will be presented. In this concept two retractable pinholes at each end of the main undulator line define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA). Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable the direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy in the micron range for target pinholes in the transverse directions over long distances. It defines the beam axis for the electron-beam-based alignment with high reproducibility. This concept complements the electron-beam-based alignment and the existing survey methods advancing the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvements of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates and a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation, providing real-time feedback for transverse position corrections, will be discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
974020
Report Number(s):
ANL/ASD/CP-57602
TRN: US1002251
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Workshop on Accelerator Alignment; Sep. 25, 2006 - Sep. 29, 2006; Stanford, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ACCURACY; ALIGNMENT; CAMERAS; ELECTRON BEAMS; FEEDBACK; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; OPTICS; PLATES; POSITIONING; TARGETS; WIGGLER MAGNETS

Citation Formats

Yang, B. X., and Friedsam, H. Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Yang, B. X., & Friedsam, H. Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.. United States.
Yang, B. X., and Friedsam, H. Sun . "Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_974020,
title = {Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.},
author = {Yang, B. X. and Friedsam, H.},
abstractNote = {A novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of a dedicated alignment undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning accelerator components in an x-ray free-electron laser will be presented. In this concept two retractable pinholes at each end of the main undulator line define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA). Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable the direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy in the micron range for target pinholes in the transverse directions over long distances. It defines the beam axis for the electron-beam-based alignment with high reproducibility. This concept complements the electron-beam-based alignment and the existing survey methods advancing the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvements of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates and a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation, providing real-time feedback for transverse position corrections, will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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