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Title: GISAXS studies of model nanocatalysts synthesized by atomic cluster deposition.

Abstract

Small nanoparticles possess unique, strongly size-dependent chemical and physical properties that make these particles ideal candidates for a number of applications, including catalysts or sensors due to their significantly higher activity and selectivity than their more bulk-like analogs. In the smallest size regime, nanocluster catalytic activity changes by orders of magnitude with the addition or removal of a single atom, thus allowing a tuning of the properties of these particles atom by atom. Equally effective tuning knobs for these model catalysts are the composition and morphology of the support, which can dramatically change the electronic structure of these particles, leading to drastic changes in both activity and specificity. However, the Achilles heal of these particles remains their sintering at elevated temperatures or when exposed to mixtures of reactive gases. In the presented paper, the issues of thermal stability, isomerization and growth of models of catalytic active sites - atomic gold and platinum clusters and nanoparticles produced by cluster deposition on technologically relevan oxide surfaces - is addressed by employing synchrotron X-ray radiation techniques.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
974011
Report Number(s):
ANL/CHM/CP-118300
TRN: US1002245
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 5th International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS 5); Jul. 30, 2006 - Aug. 2, 2006; Chicago, IL
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ATOMIC CLUSTERS; ATOMS; CATALYSTS; DEPOSITION; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; GASES; GOLD; ISOMERIZATION; MIXTURES; MORPHOLOGY; OXIDES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; PLATINUM; RADIATIONS; SINTERING; SPECIFICITY; STABILITY; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; SYNCHROTRONS; TUNING

Citation Formats

Vajda, S., Winans, R. E., Ballentine, G. E., Elam, J. W., Lee, B., Pellin, M. J., Seifert, S., Tikhonov, G. Y., and Tomczyk, N. A. GISAXS studies of model nanocatalysts synthesized by atomic cluster deposition.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Vajda, S., Winans, R. E., Ballentine, G. E., Elam, J. W., Lee, B., Pellin, M. J., Seifert, S., Tikhonov, G. Y., & Tomczyk, N. A. GISAXS studies of model nanocatalysts synthesized by atomic cluster deposition.. United States.
Vajda, S., Winans, R. E., Ballentine, G. E., Elam, J. W., Lee, B., Pellin, M. J., Seifert, S., Tikhonov, G. Y., and Tomczyk, N. A. Sun . "GISAXS studies of model nanocatalysts synthesized by atomic cluster deposition.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_974011,
title = {GISAXS studies of model nanocatalysts synthesized by atomic cluster deposition.},
author = {Vajda, S. and Winans, R. E. and Ballentine, G. E. and Elam, J. W. and Lee, B. and Pellin, M. J. and Seifert, S. and Tikhonov, G. Y. and Tomczyk, N. A.},
abstractNote = {Small nanoparticles possess unique, strongly size-dependent chemical and physical properties that make these particles ideal candidates for a number of applications, including catalysts or sensors due to their significantly higher activity and selectivity than their more bulk-like analogs. In the smallest size regime, nanocluster catalytic activity changes by orders of magnitude with the addition or removal of a single atom, thus allowing a tuning of the properties of these particles atom by atom. Equally effective tuning knobs for these model catalysts are the composition and morphology of the support, which can dramatically change the electronic structure of these particles, leading to drastic changes in both activity and specificity. However, the Achilles heal of these particles remains their sintering at elevated temperatures or when exposed to mixtures of reactive gases. In the presented paper, the issues of thermal stability, isomerization and growth of models of catalytic active sites - atomic gold and platinum clusters and nanoparticles produced by cluster deposition on technologically relevan oxide surfaces - is addressed by employing synchrotron X-ray radiation techniques.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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