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Title: The Science of Interaction

Abstract

There is a growing recognition with the visual analytics community that interaction and inquiry are inextricable. It is through the interactive manipulation of a visual interface – the analytic discourse – that knowledge is constructed, tested, refined, and shared. This paper reflects on the interaction challenges raised in the original visual analytics research and development agenda and further explores the relationship between interaction and cognition. It identifies recent exemplars of visual analytics research that have made substantive progress toward the goals of a true science of interaction, which must include theories and testable premises about the most appropriate mechanisms for human-information interaction. Six areas for further work are highlighted as those among the highest priorities for the next five years of visual analytics research: ubiquitous, embodied interaction; capturing user intentionality; knowledge-based interfaces; principles of design and perception; collaboration; and interoperability. Ultimately, the goal of a science of interaction is to support the visual analytics community through the recognition and implementation of best practices in the representation of and interaction with visual displays.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
973989
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-66748
400904120; TRN: US201007%%35
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Information Visualization, 8(4):263-274; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER GRAPHICS; MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS; INFORMATION NEEDS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Citation Formats

Pike, William A., Stasko, John T., Chang, Remco, and O'Connell, Theresa. The Science of Interaction. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1057/ivs.2009.22.
Pike, William A., Stasko, John T., Chang, Remco, & O'Connell, Theresa. The Science of Interaction. United States. doi:10.1057/ivs.2009.22.
Pike, William A., Stasko, John T., Chang, Remco, and O'Connell, Theresa. 2009. "The Science of Interaction". United States. doi:10.1057/ivs.2009.22.
@article{osti_973989,
title = {The Science of Interaction},
author = {Pike, William A. and Stasko, John T. and Chang, Remco and O'Connell, Theresa},
abstractNote = {There is a growing recognition with the visual analytics community that interaction and inquiry are inextricable. It is through the interactive manipulation of a visual interface – the analytic discourse – that knowledge is constructed, tested, refined, and shared. This paper reflects on the interaction challenges raised in the original visual analytics research and development agenda and further explores the relationship between interaction and cognition. It identifies recent exemplars of visual analytics research that have made substantive progress toward the goals of a true science of interaction, which must include theories and testable premises about the most appropriate mechanisms for human-information interaction. Six areas for further work are highlighted as those among the highest priorities for the next five years of visual analytics research: ubiquitous, embodied interaction; capturing user intentionality; knowledge-based interfaces; principles of design and perception; collaboration; and interoperability. Ultimately, the goal of a science of interaction is to support the visual analytics community through the recognition and implementation of best practices in the representation of and interaction with visual displays.},
doi = {10.1057/ivs.2009.22},
journal = {Information Visualization, 8(4):263-274},
number = 4,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 9
}
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