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Title: Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

Abstract

Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some verymore » encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R&D are that various processes involving electron ion and laser beams that have now restrictions can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment. For example, electron beam and laser welding can be performed under water, as well as, in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
973598
Report Number(s):
BNL-91080-2010-CRAD
C-01-03
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

Hershcovitch, Ady, and Furey, Michael. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/973598.
Hershcovitch, Ady, & Furey, Michael. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding. United States. doi:10.2172/973598.
Hershcovitch, Ady, and Furey, Michael. Wed . "Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding". United States. doi:10.2172/973598. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/973598.
@article{osti_973598,
title = {Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding},
author = {Hershcovitch, Ady and Furey, Michael},
abstractNote = {Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R&D are that various processes involving electron ion and laser beams that have now restrictions can, with the Plasma Shield be performed in practically any environment. For example, electron beam and laser welding can be performed under water, as well as, in situ repair of ship and nuclear reactor components. The plasma shield results in both thermal (since the plasma is hotter than the environment) and chemical shielding. The latter feature brings about in-vacuum process purity out of vacuum, and the thermal shielding aspect results in higher production rates.},
doi = {10.2172/973598},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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