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Title: Review of cryomodules and SRF challenges for light source energy recovery linacs.

Abstract

Superconducting rf (SRF) is the technology of choice for future energy-recovery linac (ERL)-based light source facilities. ERL-based light sources are required to run in a continuous wave (cw) mode as compared to the International Linear Collider (ILC), which requires a moderate repetition rate. The difference in the two operating modes (low duty factor and cw) will necessitate a fresh look at the SRF parameter space specifically suited for light source ERLs. There are still open questions regarding the choice of rf frequencies, cryomodule design, cavity cell design and number of cells, Q factor, accelerating gradient, and higher-order-mode damping. In addition, the cryoplant for such facilities will need to be designed to handle on the order of tens of kW of cooling at 2 K. The existing cryoplants cannot provide a level of efficiency to make it cost effective to operate such facilities. Therefore, consolidated R&D efforts are needed to find a more robust solution to improve the overall refrigeration efficiency.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (APS)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
973003
Report Number(s):
ANL/ASD/CP-60065
TRN: US1001570
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 41st Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL 2007); May 21, 2007 - May 25, 2007; Daresbury Laboratory, UK
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAM DYNAMICS; DAMPING; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY RECOVERY; LIGHT SOURCES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LINEAR COLLIDERS; REFRIGERATION

Citation Formats

Nassiri, A., and Accelerator Systems Division. Review of cryomodules and SRF challenges for light source energy recovery linacs.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Nassiri, A., & Accelerator Systems Division. Review of cryomodules and SRF challenges for light source energy recovery linacs.. United States.
Nassiri, A., and Accelerator Systems Division. Mon . "Review of cryomodules and SRF challenges for light source energy recovery linacs.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_973003,
title = {Review of cryomodules and SRF challenges for light source energy recovery linacs.},
author = {Nassiri, A. and Accelerator Systems Division},
abstractNote = {Superconducting rf (SRF) is the technology of choice for future energy-recovery linac (ERL)-based light source facilities. ERL-based light sources are required to run in a continuous wave (cw) mode as compared to the International Linear Collider (ILC), which requires a moderate repetition rate. The difference in the two operating modes (low duty factor and cw) will necessitate a fresh look at the SRF parameter space specifically suited for light source ERLs. There are still open questions regarding the choice of rf frequencies, cryomodule design, cavity cell design and number of cells, Q factor, accelerating gradient, and higher-order-mode damping. In addition, the cryoplant for such facilities will need to be designed to handle on the order of tens of kW of cooling at 2 K. The existing cryoplants cannot provide a level of efficiency to make it cost effective to operate such facilities. Therefore, consolidated R&D efforts are needed to find a more robust solution to improve the overall refrigeration efficiency.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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