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Title: Beam loss issues for an ERL upgrade to APS.

Abstract

The APS is considering options to upgrade its facility in the near future. After a careful review we came to the conclusion that an energy recovering linac (ERL) upgrade is the most promising option, which offers two orders of magnitude improvement in photon beam performance and utilizes most of the existing facilities. The design goals for the ERL are 7 GeV beam energy, 100 mA maximum beam current and 0.022 nm-rad emittance. The ERL could potentially generate a continuous 2 MW beam. Beam loss at such high beam power causes many problems, including radiation hazards, heat load to the superconducting rf cavities, and damage to other beamline equipment. This report presents the issues and the research and development that are necessary to achieve successful beam loss control.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (APS)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
972998
Report Number(s):
ANL/ASD/CP-59465
TRN: US1001568
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 41st Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL 2007); May 21, 2007 - May 25, 2007; Daresbury Laboratory, UK
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAM CURRENTS; BEAM DYNAMICS; CAVITIES; DESIGN; ENERGY RECOVERY; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PERFORMANCE; PHOTON BEAMS; RADIATION HAZARDS

Citation Formats

Yao, C.-Y., Emery, L., Borland, M., Xiao, A., and Accelerator Systems Division. Beam loss issues for an ERL upgrade to APS.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Yao, C.-Y., Emery, L., Borland, M., Xiao, A., & Accelerator Systems Division. Beam loss issues for an ERL upgrade to APS.. United States.
Yao, C.-Y., Emery, L., Borland, M., Xiao, A., and Accelerator Systems Division. Mon . "Beam loss issues for an ERL upgrade to APS.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_972998,
title = {Beam loss issues for an ERL upgrade to APS.},
author = {Yao, C.-Y. and Emery, L. and Borland, M. and Xiao, A. and Accelerator Systems Division},
abstractNote = {The APS is considering options to upgrade its facility in the near future. After a careful review we came to the conclusion that an energy recovering linac (ERL) upgrade is the most promising option, which offers two orders of magnitude improvement in photon beam performance and utilizes most of the existing facilities. The design goals for the ERL are 7 GeV beam energy, 100 mA maximum beam current and 0.022 nm-rad emittance. The ERL could potentially generate a continuous 2 MW beam. Beam loss at such high beam power causes many problems, including radiation hazards, heat load to the superconducting rf cavities, and damage to other beamline equipment. This report presents the issues and the research and development that are necessary to achieve successful beam loss control.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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