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Title: Analyzing cross-sector interdependencies.

Abstract

This paper discusses cross-sector infrastructure interdependencies and key risk considerations, analysis approaches, research and development needs, and the range of interdisciplinary skills required for comprehensive cross-sector analysis. Traditional analysis of interdependencies involves characterization of infrastructure-to-infrastructure linkages to identify the key infrastructure components that, if lost or degraded, could adversely affect the performance of other infrastructures. Such analysis is motivated by the recognition that a series of incidents could interact (cascade) across critical infrastructures to degrade the service upon which all depend. From a risk perspective, cross-sector analysis also must involve identifying and characterizing a wide range of threats (natural and accidental, systems related, and intentional), vulnerabilities (physical and cyber), and consequences of loss (e.g., health and safety, economic, national security, environmental, sociopolitical). Such information provides a foundation for making defensible, cost-effective infrastructure protection and operation decisions to ensure the security and reliability of our interdependent systems.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
972995
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/CP-119365
TRN: US201005%%492
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 40th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS 40); Jan. 3, 2007 - Jan. 6, 2007; Waikoloa, Big Island, HI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; NATIONAL SECURITY; PERFORMANCE; RELIABILITY; SAFETY; SECURITY

Citation Formats

Peerenboom, J. P., Fisher, R. E., and Decision and Information Sciences. Analyzing cross-sector interdependencies.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.78.
Peerenboom, J. P., Fisher, R. E., & Decision and Information Sciences. Analyzing cross-sector interdependencies.. United States. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.78.
Peerenboom, J. P., Fisher, R. E., and Decision and Information Sciences. Mon . "Analyzing cross-sector interdependencies.". United States. doi:10.1109/HICSS.2007.78.
@article{osti_972995,
title = {Analyzing cross-sector interdependencies.},
author = {Peerenboom, J. P. and Fisher, R. E. and Decision and Information Sciences},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses cross-sector infrastructure interdependencies and key risk considerations, analysis approaches, research and development needs, and the range of interdisciplinary skills required for comprehensive cross-sector analysis. Traditional analysis of interdependencies involves characterization of infrastructure-to-infrastructure linkages to identify the key infrastructure components that, if lost or degraded, could adversely affect the performance of other infrastructures. Such analysis is motivated by the recognition that a series of incidents could interact (cascade) across critical infrastructures to degrade the service upon which all depend. From a risk perspective, cross-sector analysis also must involve identifying and characterizing a wide range of threats (natural and accidental, systems related, and intentional), vulnerabilities (physical and cyber), and consequences of loss (e.g., health and safety, economic, national security, environmental, sociopolitical). Such information provides a foundation for making defensible, cost-effective infrastructure protection and operation decisions to ensure the security and reliability of our interdependent systems.},
doi = {10.1109/HICSS.2007.78},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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