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Title: Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics

Abstract

Selection is a biological force, causing genotypic and phenotypic change over time. Whether environmental or human induced, selective pressures shape the genotypes and the phenotypes of organisms both in nature and in the laboratory. In nature, selective pressure is highly dynamic and the sum of the environment and other organisms. In the laboratory, selection is used in genetic studies and industrial strain development programs to isolate mutants affecting biological processes of interest to researchers. Selective pressures are important considerations for fungal biology. In the laboratory a number of fungi are used as experimental systems to study a wide range of biological processes and in nature fungi are important pathogens of plants and animals and play key roles in carbon and nitrogen cycling. The continued development of high throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to characterize at the genomic level, the effect of selective pressures both in the lab and in nature for filamentous fungi as well as other organisms.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
972534
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-69812
Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912; BM0102070; TRN: US201006%%119
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Microbiology, 11(12):2955-2958; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ANIMALS; BIOLOGY; CARBON; FUNGI; GENETICS; MUTANTS; NITROGEN; PATHOGENS; SHAPE; STRAINS; fungi, genomics, selection

Citation Formats

Baker, Scott E. Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02112.x.
Baker, Scott E. Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02112.x.
Baker, Scott E. 2009. "Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02112.x.
@article{osti_972534,
title = {Selection to sequence: opportunities in fungal genomics},
author = {Baker, Scott E.},
abstractNote = {Selection is a biological force, causing genotypic and phenotypic change over time. Whether environmental or human induced, selective pressures shape the genotypes and the phenotypes of organisms both in nature and in the laboratory. In nature, selective pressure is highly dynamic and the sum of the environment and other organisms. In the laboratory, selection is used in genetic studies and industrial strain development programs to isolate mutants affecting biological processes of interest to researchers. Selective pressures are important considerations for fungal biology. In the laboratory a number of fungi are used as experimental systems to study a wide range of biological processes and in nature fungi are important pathogens of plants and animals and play key roles in carbon and nitrogen cycling. The continued development of high throughput sequencing technologies makes it possible to characterize at the genomic level, the effect of selective pressures both in the lab and in nature for filamentous fungi as well as other organisms.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1462-2920.2009.02112.x},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology, 11(12):2955-2958},
number = 12,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
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