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Title: Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River

Abstract

Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
972200
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-2007-00076
TRN: US1001960
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: North American Journal of Fisheries Managment
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LARVAE; PARTURITION; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; STRIPED BASS; POPULATION DYNAMICS

Citation Formats

Martin, D., and Paller, M.. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Martin, D., & Paller, M.. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River. United States.
Martin, D., and Paller, M.. Tue . "Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/972200.
@article{osti_972200,
title = {Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River},
author = {Martin, D. and Paller, M.},
abstractNote = {Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.},
doi = {},
journal = {North American Journal of Fisheries Managment},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The possible existence of genetically distinct populations of spawning striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the river systems of the upper Chesapeake Bay was investigated by a biochemical genetic approach. Samples of blood and liver from adult fish were obtained during the 1976 spawning runs from the Rappanhannock (Virginia), Potomac, Choptank, Sassafras, Bohemia, and Elk rivers (Maryland), and Maryland waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Samples were analyzed for frequency of occurrence of a polymorphic liver enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and variable serum proteins which were not correlated with age or sex. Multivariate and Bayesian analyses of these data indicate apparentmore » genetic homogeneity of spawning bass within the upper Chesapeake Bay. If natal stream homing occurs, a sufficient number of wanderers may provide significant gene flow among river systems. The results suggest that long-term management of the fishery need not be totally on the basis of separate river units.« less
  • In the spring of 1975, an acoustic survey was made of a 40-mile section of the Potomac River. This survey was part of a program designed to estimate the distribution and abundance of spawning striped bass. The total number of striped bass in the 40-mile sector of the Potomac from Mockley Point to Morgantown was estimated to be between 2 and 4.5 million adult fish during spawning in late April. The highest population density was found between Douglas Point and Possum Point. The surveys were part of the Potomac River Fisheries Program and were conducted for the power plant sitingmore » program of the state of Maryland.« less
  • The distribution of the 1974 striped bass spawning stock between Smith and Whitestone Pts. in the Potomac River was surveyed acoustically. Acoustic data were compared with gill net catches and egg distributions. The results were used to estimate the abundance and distribution of the striped bass. Striped bass populations support one of the most important commercial and recreational fisheries in Maryland. Concern for the maintenance of stocks arises from the location of the spawning grounds in areas subject to disturbances produced by existing and proposed power plants.
  • This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fishmore » populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.« less
  • Striped bass were exposed to {sup 14}C-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in single-dose and multiple-dose experiments. Samples were analyzed to determine rate constants for PCB elimination from individual tissues, PCB concentration in tissues, the proportion of the PCB burden retained and the proportion of the cumulative dose retained by each tissue at various times after exposure. An experiment was also conducted to determine both the potential for secondary PCB uptake in dietary exposure studies and the relative tissue disposition of PCBs assimilated from dietary sources as compared to direct water uptake. PCBs were present in the tissues of striped bass within 6more » h after administration of a single dose. Certain tissue compartments, such as the liver/gall bladder, accumulated PCBs over a period of 48 h even though the whole-body burden had decreased between 24 and 48 h. Except for the gills, elimination rate constants for all tissues were similar and were to the whole body elimination rate constant. Elimination during the first few hours following exposure to PCBs may be due to equilibrium partitioning from the gill to the environment. The multiple-dose study showed that PCB burdens in striped bass continued to increase with dosing. However, tissue-specific rate constants for PCB elimination led to an increased flux of PCB out of tissues, and an overall decline in the percent of the cumulative dose remaining in the body 48 h after administration of each dose. The most likely route for PCB elimination from striped bass was from tissues to the liver and thence to the intestine via the bile. These were no differences in the tissue disposition of PCB related to route of exposure.« less