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Title: Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

Abstract

In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range onmore » engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia reduction in fuel allowing potential reductions in the burner NOx production. These reductions of NOx emissions and expanded alternative fuel capability make the rich catalytic combustor uniquely situated to provide reductions in capital costs through elimination of requirements for SCR, operating costs through reduction in need for NOx abating dilution, SCR operating costs, and need for co-firing fuels allowing use of lower value but more available fuels, and efficiency of an engine through reduction in dilution flows.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Precision Combustion, Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
972087
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-03NT41721
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; AMMONIA; AVOIDANCE; BLAST FURNACES; BURNERS; BURNOUT; CALORIFIC VALUE; CAPITALIZED COST; CATALYSTS; CATALYTIC COMBUSTORS; COMBUSTION; COMBUSTION PRODUCTS; COMBUSTORS; DILUTION; EFFICIENCY; ENGINES; FUEL GAS; HYDROGEN; OPERATING COST; POWER PLANTS; POWER SYSTEMS; SOLVENTS

Citation Formats

Etemad, Shahrokh, Baird, Benjamin, Alavandi, Sandeep, and Pfefferle, William. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/972087.
Etemad, Shahrokh, Baird, Benjamin, Alavandi, Sandeep, & Pfefferle, William. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/972087
Etemad, Shahrokh, Baird, Benjamin, Alavandi, Sandeep, and Pfefferle, William. 2008. "Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/972087. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/972087.
@article{osti_972087,
title = {Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants},
author = {Etemad, Shahrokh and Baird, Benjamin and Alavandi, Sandeep and Pfefferle, William},
abstractNote = {In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown to be active in ammonia reduction in fuel allowing potential reductions in the burner NOx production. These reductions of NOx emissions and expanded alternative fuel capability make the rich catalytic combustor uniquely situated to provide reductions in capital costs through elimination of requirements for SCR, operating costs through reduction in need for NOx abating dilution, SCR operating costs, and need for co-firing fuels allowing use of lower value but more available fuels, and efficiency of an engine through reduction in dilution flows.},
doi = {10.2172/972087},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/972087}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {3}
}