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Title: Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires

Abstract

Low dimensional systems have fascinated physicists for a long time due to their unusual properties such as charge fractionalization, semionic statistics, and Luttinger liquid behavior among others. In nature, however, low dimensional systems often suffer from thermal fluctuations that can make these systems structurally unstable. Human beings, however, can trick nature by producing artificial structures which are not naturally produced. This Colloquium reviews the problem of self-assembled atomic wires on solid surfaces from an experimental and theoretical point of view. These materials represent a class of one-dimensional systems with very unusual properties that can open doors to the study of exotic physics that cannot be studied otherwise.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
972018
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Reviews of Modern Physics; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ATOMS; FLUCTUATIONS; PHYSICS; STATISTICS

Citation Formats

Snijders, Paul C, and Weitering, Harm H. Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.82.307.
Snijders, Paul C, & Weitering, Harm H. Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires. United States. doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.82.307.
Snijders, Paul C, and Weitering, Harm H. 2010. "Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires". United States. doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.82.307.
@article{osti_972018,
title = {Electronic instabilities in self-assembled atom wires},
author = {Snijders, Paul C and Weitering, Harm H},
abstractNote = {Low dimensional systems have fascinated physicists for a long time due to their unusual properties such as charge fractionalization, semionic statistics, and Luttinger liquid behavior among others. In nature, however, low dimensional systems often suffer from thermal fluctuations that can make these systems structurally unstable. Human beings, however, can trick nature by producing artificial structures which are not naturally produced. This Colloquium reviews the problem of self-assembled atomic wires on solid surfaces from an experimental and theoretical point of view. These materials represent a class of one-dimensional systems with very unusual properties that can open doors to the study of exotic physics that cannot be studied otherwise.},
doi = {10.1103/RevModPhys.82.307},
journal = {Reviews of Modern Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 82,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 1
}
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