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Title: Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.

Abstract

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. The concepts presented are most useful to state and national energy agencies tasked as first responders to such emergencies. Within minutes of the occurrence of a break, NGfast can generate an HTML-formatted report to support briefing materials for state and federal emergency responders. Sample partial results of a simulation of a real system in the United States are presented.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
971950
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/CP-58954
TRN: US201005%%75
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 Winter Simulation Conference; Dec. 9, 2007 - Dec. 12, 2007; Washington, DC
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; ANL; IMPORTS; NATURAL GAS; PIPELINES; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Portante, E. C., Craig, B. A., and Folga, S.M.. Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/WSC.2007.4419711.
Portante, E. C., Craig, B. A., & Folga, S.M.. Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.. United States. doi:10.1109/WSC.2007.4419711.
Portante, E. C., Craig, B. A., and Folga, S.M.. Mon . "Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.". United States. doi:10.1109/WSC.2007.4419711.
@article{osti_971950,
title = {Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.},
author = {Portante, E. C. and Craig, B. A. and Folga, S.M.},
abstractNote = {This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. The concepts presented are most useful to state and national energy agencies tasked as first responders to such emergencies. Within minutes of the occurrence of a break, NGfast can generate an HTML-formatted report to support briefing materials for state and federal emergency responders. Sample partial results of a simulation of a real system in the United States are presented.},
doi = {10.1109/WSC.2007.4419711},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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