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Title: EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters

Abstract

Recycling of the spent rinse water discharged from the wet benches commonly used in semiconductor processing is one tactic for responding to the targets for water usage published in the 1997 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). Not only does the NTRS list a target that dramatically reduces total water usage/unit area of silicon manufactured by the industry in the future but for the years 2003 and beyond, the NTRS actually touts goals which would have semiconductor manufacturers drawing less water from a regional water supply per unit area of silicon manufactured than the quantity of ultrapure water (UPW) used in the production of that same silicon. Achieving this latter NTRS target strongly implies more widespread recycling of spent rinse waters at semiconductor manufacturing sites. In spite of the fact that, by most metrics, spent rinse waters are of much higher purity than incoming municipal waters, recycling of these spent rinse waters back into the UPW production plant is not a simple, straightforward task. The rub is that certain of the chemicals used in semiconductor manufacturing, and thus potentially present in trace concentrations (or more) in spent rinse waters, are not found in municipal water supplies and are not necessarilymore » removed by the conventional UPW production sequence used by semiconductor manufacturers. Some of these contaminants, unique to spent rinse waters, may actually foul the resins and membranes of the UPW system, posing a threat to UPW production and potentially even causing a shutdown.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
9717
Report Number(s):
SAND99-2092J
TRN: AH200125%%26
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Semiconductor International
Additional Journal Information:
Other Information: Submitted to Semiconductor International; PBD: 11 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MANUFACTURERS; MEMBRANES; RECYCLING; RESINS; SILICON; WASTE WATER; WATER TREATMENT; MICROELECTRONICS

Citation Formats

Donovan, Robert P., and Morrison, Dennis J. EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Donovan, Robert P., & Morrison, Dennis J. EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters. United States.
Donovan, Robert P., and Morrison, Dennis J. Wed . "EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9717.
@article{osti_9717,
title = {EDI as a Treatment Module in Recycling Spent Rinse Waters},
author = {Donovan, Robert P. and Morrison, Dennis J.},
abstractNote = {Recycling of the spent rinse water discharged from the wet benches commonly used in semiconductor processing is one tactic for responding to the targets for water usage published in the 1997 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS). Not only does the NTRS list a target that dramatically reduces total water usage/unit area of silicon manufactured by the industry in the future but for the years 2003 and beyond, the NTRS actually touts goals which would have semiconductor manufacturers drawing less water from a regional water supply per unit area of silicon manufactured than the quantity of ultrapure water (UPW) used in the production of that same silicon. Achieving this latter NTRS target strongly implies more widespread recycling of spent rinse waters at semiconductor manufacturing sites. In spite of the fact that, by most metrics, spent rinse waters are of much higher purity than incoming municipal waters, recycling of these spent rinse waters back into the UPW production plant is not a simple, straightforward task. The rub is that certain of the chemicals used in semiconductor manufacturing, and thus potentially present in trace concentrations (or more) in spent rinse waters, are not found in municipal water supplies and are not necessarily removed by the conventional UPW production sequence used by semiconductor manufacturers. Some of these contaminants, unique to spent rinse waters, may actually foul the resins and membranes of the UPW system, posing a threat to UPW production and potentially even causing a shutdown.},
doi = {},
journal = {Semiconductor International},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}