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Title: The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.

Abstract

Synergia2 is a beam dynamics modeling and simulation application for high-energy accelerators such as the Tevatron at Fermilab and the International Linear Collider, which is now under planning and development. Synergia2 is a hybrid, multilanguage software package comprised of two separate accelerator physics packages (Synergia and MaryLie/Impact) and one high-performance computer science package (PETSc). We describe our approach to producing a set of beam dynamics-specific software components based on the Common Component Architecture specification. Among other topics, we describe particular experiences with the following tasks: using Python steering to guide the creation of interfaces and to prototype components; working with legacy Fortran codes; and an example component-based, beam dynamics simulation.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
971475
Report Number(s):
ANL/MCS/CP-60003
TRN: US1001209
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: OOPSLA 2007; Oct. 21, 2007 - Oct. 25, 2007; Montreal, Canada
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ARCHITECTURE; BEAM DYNAMICS; COMPUTERS; FERMILAB; FERMILAB TEVATRON; FORTRAN; LINEAR COLLIDERS; PHYSICS; PLANNING; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Dechow, D. R., Norris, B., Amundson, J., Mathematics and Computer Science, Tech-X Corp, and FNAL. The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Dechow, D. R., Norris, B., Amundson, J., Mathematics and Computer Science, Tech-X Corp, & FNAL. The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.. United States.
Dechow, D. R., Norris, B., Amundson, J., Mathematics and Computer Science, Tech-X Corp, and FNAL. Mon . "The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_971475,
title = {The common component architecture for particle accelerator simulations.},
author = {Dechow, D. R. and Norris, B. and Amundson, J. and Mathematics and Computer Science and Tech-X Corp and FNAL},
abstractNote = {Synergia2 is a beam dynamics modeling and simulation application for high-energy accelerators such as the Tevatron at Fermilab and the International Linear Collider, which is now under planning and development. Synergia2 is a hybrid, multilanguage software package comprised of two separate accelerator physics packages (Synergia and MaryLie/Impact) and one high-performance computer science package (PETSc). We describe our approach to producing a set of beam dynamics-specific software components based on the Common Component Architecture specification. Among other topics, we describe particular experiences with the following tasks: using Python steering to guide the creation of interfaces and to prototype components; working with legacy Fortran codes; and an example component-based, beam dynamics simulation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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