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Title: Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.

Abstract

The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
970792
Report Number(s):
ANL/PHY/CP-60129
TRN: US1000912
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Conference on Proton Emitting Nuclei and Related Topics(PROCON07); Jun. 17, 2007 - Jun. 23, 2007; Lisbon, Portugal
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASTROPHYSICS; BETA DECAY; CARBON; CROSS SECTIONS; NITROGEN; NOVAE; NUCLEI; OXYGEN; PROTONS; STABLE ISOTOPES

Citation Formats

Rehm, K. E., and Physics. Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2827261.
Rehm, K. E., & Physics. Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2827261.
Rehm, K. E., and Physics. Mon . "Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2827261.
@article{osti_970792,
title = {Proton-rich nuclei in nuclear astrophysics.},
author = {Rehm, K. E. and Physics},
abstractNote = {The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent results involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2827261},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Novae and supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions which produce the majority of heavy elements in the Universe and generate prodigious amounts of energy. Our understanding of these catastrophic astrophysical events will be greatly enhanced by a new development in nuclear physics: the availability of low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei. By utilizing these beams for absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p,{gamma}) and ({alpha},{gamma}) capture reactions, we can begin to resolve the significant qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of nuclear astrophysics studies with the unique radioactive beams planned for the Holifieldmore » Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented.« less
  • The stable isotopes which we observe on Earth are to a large extent, produced in nature via a 'detour' through unstable nuclei. The reaction path leading through proton-rich nuclei is the so-called rapid proton capture process, where, starting from carbon, nitrogen and oxygen through successive capture or protons and alphas, followed by beta decays, nuclei up to the mass 100 region can be produced. In order to understand the reaction paths and the conditions at various astrophysical sites (e.g. Novae and X-ray bursts) cross sections, masses and half-lives of unstable nuclei have to be measured. In this contribution recent resultsmore » involving proton-rich nuclei are discussed.« less
  • We have developed a new experimental technique to measure very low energy protons from beta-delayed p-decay of proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer at TAMU. Recently we have investigated the beta-delayed p-decays of {sup 23}Al and {sup 31}Cl and obtained information on the resonances in the reactions {sup 22}Na(p,gamma){sup 23}Mg and {sup 30}P(p,gamma){sup 31}S, respectively. These reactions are important in explosive H-burning in Novae. A simple setup consisting of a telescope made of a thin double sided Si strip detector (p-detector) backed or sandwiched between two thick Si detectors (beta-detectors) was designed. We studied two differentmore » p-detectors and found that the thinner detectors with a small cell size are best to measure proton energies as low as 2-300 keV.« less
  • While prototype experiments with proton-rich radioactive beams have been formed at various existing facilities, investigations with accelerated neutron-rich beams have to await the availability of the next-generation facilities. In this contribution possible future experiments with neutron-rich beams in the areas of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics, as well as novel production and detection techniques for these beams are discussed.
  • The symposium Nuclei in the Cosmos III was held at Assergi in Italy. These proceedings represent the articles presented at this symposium. The topics addressed included reaction rates, models of nucleosynthesis, measurements of abundance and isotope anomalies in meteorites, evolution of the solar system and modeling of the evolution of galaxies. The majority of papers dealt with various aspects of nuclear astrophysics. there were 107 papers at the symposium, 48 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. (AIP)