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Title: Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.

Abstract

Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} with 200 x 200 {micro}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate - 8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode - make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
970786
Report Number(s):
ANL/XSD/CP-59098
TRN: US1000907
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation (SRI2007); Apr. 25, 2007 - Apr. 27, 2007; Baton Rouge, LA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS; LIGHT SOURCES; MODULATION; PHOTONS; SILICON; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; SYNCHROTRONS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; TUNGSTEN

Citation Formats

Lee, J. H., Miceli, A., Almer, J., Bernier, J., Chapman, K., Chupas, P., Haeffner, D., Lee, P. L., Lienert, U., Aydiner, C., Vera, G., Kump, K., LANL, and GE Healthcare. Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2007.08.103.
Lee, J. H., Miceli, A., Almer, J., Bernier, J., Chapman, K., Chupas, P., Haeffner, D., Lee, P. L., Lienert, U., Aydiner, C., Vera, G., Kump, K., LANL, & GE Healthcare. Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2007.08.103.
Lee, J. H., Miceli, A., Almer, J., Bernier, J., Chapman, K., Chupas, P., Haeffner, D., Lee, P. L., Lienert, U., Aydiner, C., Vera, G., Kump, K., LANL, and GE Healthcare. Mon . "Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2007.08.103.
@article{osti_970786,
title = {Chacterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source.},
author = {Lee, J. H. and Miceli, A. and Almer, J. and Bernier, J. and Chapman, K. and Chupas, P. and Haeffner, D. and Lee, P. L. and Lienert, U. and Aydiner, C. and Vera, G. and Kump, K. and LANL and GE Healthcare},
abstractNote = {Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41 x 41 cm{sup 2} with 200 x 200 {micro}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate - 8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode - make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2007.08.103},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 {micro}m x 200 {micro}m pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. Themore » modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 {micro}m x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO{sub 2} powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s{sup -1} in radiography mode, 30 frames s{sup -1} in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO{sub 2} in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements.« less
  • The design of electron storage rings for the production of synchrotron radiation has become increasingly sophisticated in recent years. To assist in the optimization of such storage rings, a new, user-friendly code to treat the relevant collective phenomena, called ZAP, has been written at LBL. The code is designed primarily to carry out parameter studies of electron storage rings, although options for protons or heavy ions are included where appropriate. In this paper, we first describe the contents of the code itself, and then illustrate, via selected examples, how the collective effects treated by ZAP manifest themselves in the newmore » generation of synchrotron light sources.« less
  • Two dimensional amorphous silicon arrays are the emerging technology for digital medical x-ray imaging. This paper demonstrates an improved pixel design compared with the current generation of imagers. The geometry of the pixel sensor has been extended from a mesa isolated structure into a continuous layer above the readout structures of the array. This approach improves sensitivity to visible light, and to x-ray illumination when coupled with a conversion phosphor. Furthermore, this 3-dimensional geometry allows for the fabrication of the finest pitch amorphous silicon array yet manufactured, with a pixel size of 64 {micro}m square. A test array (512 xmore » 640 pixels) has been fabricated and tested which demonstrates the success of this approach.« less
  • This study was carried out to determine the stability of the response of amorphous silicon (a-Si)-flat panel imagers for dosimetry applications. Measurements of the imager's response under reference conditions were performed on a regular basis for four detectors of the same manufacturer. We found that the ambient temperature influenced the dark-field, while the gain of the imager signal was unaffected. Therefore, temperature fluctuations were corrected for by applying a 'dynamic' dark-field correction. This correction method also removed the influence of a small, irreversible increase of the dark-field current, which was equal to 0.5% of the dynamic range of the imagermore » per year and was probably caused by mild radiation damage to the a-Si array. By applying a dynamic dark-field correction, excellent stability of the response over the entire panel of all imagers of 0.5% (1 SD) was obtained over an observation period up to 23 months. However, two imagers had to be replaced after several months. For one imager, an image segment stopped functioning, while the image quality of the other imager degraded significantly. We conclude that the tested a-Si EPIDs have a very stable response and are therefore well suited for dosimetry. We recommend, however, applying quality assurance tests dedicated to both imaging and dosimetry.« less