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Title: Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

Abstract

To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
970353
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-64109
KP1704020; TRN: US201003%%516
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(20):7769-7793; Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 20
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; GEOGRAPHY; LIGHT SCATTERING; MASS SPECTROMETERS; METEOROLOGY; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SHAPE

Citation Formats

Cross, E., Onasch, Timothy B., Canagaratna, Manjula, Jayne, J. T., Kimmel, Joel, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Alexander, M. L., Worsnop, Douglas R., and Davidovits, Paul. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-9-7769-2009.
Cross, E., Onasch, Timothy B., Canagaratna, Manjula, Jayne, J. T., Kimmel, Joel, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Alexander, M. L., Worsnop, Douglas R., & Davidovits, Paul. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-9-7769-2009.
Cross, E., Onasch, Timothy B., Canagaratna, Manjula, Jayne, J. T., Kimmel, Joel, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Alexander, M. L., Worsnop, Douglas R., and Davidovits, Paul. 2009. "Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-9-7769-2009.
@article{osti_970353,
title = {Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer},
author = {Cross, E. and Onasch, Timothy B. and Canagaratna, Manjula and Jayne, J. T. and Kimmel, Joel and Yu, Xiao-Ying and Alexander, M. L. and Worsnop, Douglas R. and Davidovits, Paul},
abstractNote = {To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-9-7769-2009},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(20):7769-7793},
number = 20,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
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