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Title: Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

Abstract

Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13C a, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenonmore » are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
970017
Report Number(s):
LBNL-46422
TRN: US1000714
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Designation of Academic Dissertation: doctoral; Academic Degree: Ph.D.; Name of Academic Institution: University of California at Berkeley; Location of Academic Institution: Berkeley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CHEMICAL SHIFT; DISEASES; MIXTURES; MUTANTS; MUTATIONS; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; OVERHAUSER EFFECT; PEPTIDES; PRODUCTION; PROTEINS; RESIDUES; SENSITIVITY; TRANSGENIC MICE; XENON; nuclear magnetic resonance for studying biological molecules

Citation Formats

Laws, David Douglas. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/970017.
Laws, David Douglas. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules. United States. doi:10.2172/970017.
Laws, David Douglas. Thu . "Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules". United States. doi:10.2172/970017. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/970017.
@article{osti_970017,
title = {Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules},
author = {Laws, David Douglas},
abstractNote = {Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.},
doi = {10.2172/970017},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
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