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Title: Application of End-Exhaled Breath Monitoring to Assess Carbon Monoxide Exposures of Wildland Firefighters at Prescribed Burns.

Abstract

Exposure to the range of combustion products from wildland fires has been demonstrated to cause respiratory irritation and decreased lung function among firefighters. The measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) has been previously shown to be highly correlated with the range of contaminants found in wildland fires. In this article, we assess the feasibility of using a simple, noninvasive biological test to assess exposure to CO for a group of wildland firefighters. Measurements of CO exposure were collected using personal monitors as well as in exhaled breath for wildland firefighters who conducted prescribed burns in February–March 2004. Overall, the CO concentrations measured in this study group were low with a shift mean of 1.87 ppm. Correspondingly, the cross-shift difference in carboxyhemoglobin as estimated from exhaled breath CO levels was also low (median increase =+0.2% carboxyhemoglobin). The use of exhaled breath measurements for CO has limitations in characterizing exposures within this worker population.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH)
OSTI Identifier:
969886
Report Number(s):
na
09-05-P
DOE Contract Number:  
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Inhalation Toxicology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Carbon Monoxide exposure; Wildland Firefighters; Breath monitoring; Prescribed burning

Citation Formats

Dunn, K H, Devaux, I, Stock, A, and Naeher, L P. Application of End-Exhaled Breath Monitoring to Assess Carbon Monoxide Exposures of Wildland Firefighters at Prescribed Burns.. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1080/08958370802207300.
Dunn, K H, Devaux, I, Stock, A, & Naeher, L P. Application of End-Exhaled Breath Monitoring to Assess Carbon Monoxide Exposures of Wildland Firefighters at Prescribed Burns.. United States. doi:10.1080/08958370802207300.
Dunn, K H, Devaux, I, Stock, A, and Naeher, L P. Wed . "Application of End-Exhaled Breath Monitoring to Assess Carbon Monoxide Exposures of Wildland Firefighters at Prescribed Burns.". United States. doi:10.1080/08958370802207300.
@article{osti_969886,
title = {Application of End-Exhaled Breath Monitoring to Assess Carbon Monoxide Exposures of Wildland Firefighters at Prescribed Burns.},
author = {Dunn, K H and Devaux, I and Stock, A and Naeher, L P},
abstractNote = {Exposure to the range of combustion products from wildland fires has been demonstrated to cause respiratory irritation and decreased lung function among firefighters. The measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) has been previously shown to be highly correlated with the range of contaminants found in wildland fires. In this article, we assess the feasibility of using a simple, noninvasive biological test to assess exposure to CO for a group of wildland firefighters. Measurements of CO exposure were collected using personal monitors as well as in exhaled breath for wildland firefighters who conducted prescribed burns in February–March 2004. Overall, the CO concentrations measured in this study group were low with a shift mean of 1.87 ppm. Correspondingly, the cross-shift difference in carboxyhemoglobin as estimated from exhaled breath CO levels was also low (median increase =+0.2% carboxyhemoglobin). The use of exhaled breath measurements for CO has limitations in characterizing exposures within this worker population.},
doi = {10.1080/08958370802207300},
journal = {Inhalation Toxicology},
number = 1,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {4}
}