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Title: Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

Abstract

This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
969722
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-500-42362
TRN: US201002%%389
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; BEARINGS; CALCULATION METHODS; DESIGN; MANUFACTURERS; PERFORMANCE; RECOMMENDATIONS; ROLLING; WIND TURBINES; YAW AND PITCH; MOTION SUPPORT; WIND TURBINE; ROLLING BEARING ANALYTICAL METHODS; BEARING LIFE RATINGS; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Harris, T., Rumbarger, J. H., and Butterfield, C. P. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/969722.
Harris, T., Rumbarger, J. H., & Butterfield, C. P. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life. United States. doi:10.2172/969722.
Harris, T., Rumbarger, J. H., and Butterfield, C. P. Tue . "Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life". United States. doi:10.2172/969722. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/969722.
@article{osti_969722,
title = {Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life},
author = {Harris, T. and Rumbarger, J. H. and Butterfield, C. P.},
abstractNote = {This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.},
doi = {10.2172/969722},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Tue Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}

Technical Report:

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