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Title: Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments

Abstract

Most of ASTM Committee G2's erosion, wear, and friction test standards were developed for use with bulk materials, yet there is a growing need to evaluate the tribological behavior of films, coatings, and surface treatments (FCSTs), some that affect layers only tens of nanometers to a few micrometers thick. Tribotesting standards for bulk materials can sometimes be modified for use on FCSTs, but the conditions and methods developed for bulk materials may sometimes be too severe or inapplicable. An internet search and literature review indicated that a number of G2 Committee standards are currently being used for FCSTs. Of these, ASTM G99 and G65 seem to be the most popular. When attempting to apply an existing wear standard for bulk materials to FCSTs, two key issues must be addressed: (1) whether changes are needed in the magnitudes of the applied conditions, and (2) whether more precise methods are needed to measure the magnitude of surface damage. Straightforward calculations underscore the limitations for wear measurement of thin layers when evaluated using block-on-ring and pin-on-disk tests. Finally, suggestions are given for modifying selected ASTM G2 standards to enable their use on films, coatings, and surface treatments.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
968598
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of ASTM International; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COATINGS; FRICTION; SURFACE TREATMENTS; THIN FILMS; MECHANICAL TESTS; STANDARDS; WEAR RESISTANCE; EROSION; TRIBOLOGY; tribology; coatings; thin films; surface treatments; wear; erosion

Citation Formats

Blau, Peter Julian. Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1520/JAI101177.
Blau, Peter Julian. Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments. United States. doi:10.1520/JAI101177.
Blau, Peter Julian. Mon . "Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments". United States. doi:10.1520/JAI101177.
@article{osti_968598,
title = {Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments},
author = {Blau, Peter Julian},
abstractNote = {Most of ASTM Committee G2's erosion, wear, and friction test standards were developed for use with bulk materials, yet there is a growing need to evaluate the tribological behavior of films, coatings, and surface treatments (FCSTs), some that affect layers only tens of nanometers to a few micrometers thick. Tribotesting standards for bulk materials can sometimes be modified for use on FCSTs, but the conditions and methods developed for bulk materials may sometimes be too severe or inapplicable. An internet search and literature review indicated that a number of G2 Committee standards are currently being used for FCSTs. Of these, ASTM G99 and G65 seem to be the most popular. When attempting to apply an existing wear standard for bulk materials to FCSTs, two key issues must be addressed: (1) whether changes are needed in the magnitudes of the applied conditions, and (2) whether more precise methods are needed to measure the magnitude of surface damage. Straightforward calculations underscore the limitations for wear measurement of thin layers when evaluated using block-on-ring and pin-on-disk tests. Finally, suggestions are given for modifying selected ASTM G2 standards to enable their use on films, coatings, and surface treatments.},
doi = {10.1520/JAI101177},
journal = {Journal of ASTM International},
number = 10,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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