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Title: Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

Abstract

This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Pennsylvania State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
967083
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/15749-3
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-05ER15749
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; semiconductor; nanowire; hydrogen; photoelectrochemistry

Citation Formats

Mallouk, Thomas E, and Redwing, Joan M. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/967083.
Mallouk, Thomas E, & Redwing, Joan M. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays. United States. doi:10.2172/967083.
Mallouk, Thomas E, and Redwing, Joan M. Tue . "Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays". United States. doi:10.2172/967083. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/967083.
@article{osti_967083,
title = {Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays},
author = {Mallouk, Thomas E and Redwing, Joan M},
abstractNote = {This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.},
doi = {10.2172/967083},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Tue Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}

Technical Report:

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