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Title: Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations

Abstract

The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate slingmore » protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
966779
Report Number(s):
RPP-RPT-42583-Rev0
TRN: US200923%%5
DOE Contract Number:  
AC27-08RV14800
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; HOISTS; ACCIDENTS; MATERIALS HANDLING; RECOMMENDATIONS; SAFETY ENGINEERING; FAILURES; EQUIPMENT PROTECTION DEVICES; STANDARDS

Citation Formats

Henderson, C. S., and Mackey, Thomas C. Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/966779.
Henderson, C. S., & Mackey, Thomas C. Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations. United States. doi:10.2172/966779.
Henderson, C. S., and Mackey, Thomas C. Mon . "Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations". United States. doi:10.2172/966779. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/966779.
@article{osti_966779,
title = {Synthetic Sling Failure - Evaluations and Recommendations},
author = {Henderson, C. S. and Mackey, Thomas C.},
abstractNote = {The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.},
doi = {10.2172/966779},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {10}
}