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Title: Modeling Altruistic and Aggressive Driver Behavior in a No-Notice Evacuation

Abstract

This study examines the impact of altruistic and aggressive driver behavior on the effectiveness of an evacuation for a section of downtown Atlanta. The study area includes 37 signalized intersections, seven ramps, and 48 parking lots that vary by size, type (lot versus garage), peak volume, and number of ingress and egress points. A detailed microscopic model of the study area was created in VISSIM. Different scenarios examined the impacts of driver behavior on parking lot discharge rates and the loading rates from side streets on primary evacuation routes. A new methodology was created to accurately represent parking lot discharge rates. This study is also unique in that it assumes a "worst case scenario" that occurs with no advance notice during the morning peak period, when vehicles must transition from inbound to outbound routes. Simulation results indicate that while overall network clearance times are similar across scenarios, the distribution of delay on individual routes and across parking lots differ markedly. More equitable solutions (defined as the allocation of delay from parking lots and side streets to main evacuation routes) were observed with altruistic driver behavior.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Kimley-Horn and Associates
  2. Georgia Institute of Technology
  3. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
966720
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The 87th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, USA, 20070113, 20080117
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ATLANTA; ROADS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EVACUATION; TRAFFIC CONTROL; MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATORS; BEHAVIOR

Citation Formats

Brandstetter, Tim, Garrow, Dr. Laurie, Hunter, Dr. Michael, and Southworth, Frank. Modeling Altruistic and Aggressive Driver Behavior in a No-Notice Evacuation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Brandstetter, Tim, Garrow, Dr. Laurie, Hunter, Dr. Michael, & Southworth, Frank. Modeling Altruistic and Aggressive Driver Behavior in a No-Notice Evacuation. United States.
Brandstetter, Tim, Garrow, Dr. Laurie, Hunter, Dr. Michael, and Southworth, Frank. Mon . "Modeling Altruistic and Aggressive Driver Behavior in a No-Notice Evacuation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_966720,
title = {Modeling Altruistic and Aggressive Driver Behavior in a No-Notice Evacuation},
author = {Brandstetter, Tim and Garrow, Dr. Laurie and Hunter, Dr. Michael and Southworth, Frank},
abstractNote = {This study examines the impact of altruistic and aggressive driver behavior on the effectiveness of an evacuation for a section of downtown Atlanta. The study area includes 37 signalized intersections, seven ramps, and 48 parking lots that vary by size, type (lot versus garage), peak volume, and number of ingress and egress points. A detailed microscopic model of the study area was created in VISSIM. Different scenarios examined the impacts of driver behavior on parking lot discharge rates and the loading rates from side streets on primary evacuation routes. A new methodology was created to accurately represent parking lot discharge rates. This study is also unique in that it assumes a "worst case scenario" that occurs with no advance notice during the morning peak period, when vehicles must transition from inbound to outbound routes. Simulation results indicate that while overall network clearance times are similar across scenarios, the distribution of delay on individual routes and across parking lots differ markedly. More equitable solutions (defined as the allocation of delay from parking lots and side streets to main evacuation routes) were observed with altruistic driver behavior.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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