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Title: Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.

Abstract

Microtubules and motor proteins are protein-based biological agents that work cooperatively to facilitate the organization and transport of nanomaterials within living organisms. This report describes the application of these biological agents as tools in a novel, interdisciplinary scheme for assembling integrated nanostructures. Specifically, selective chemistries were used to direct the favorable adsorption of active motor proteins onto lithographically-defined gold electrodes. Taking advantage of the specific affinity these motor proteins have for microtubules, the motor proteins were used to capture polymerized microtubules out of suspension to form dense patterns of microtubules and microtubule bridges between gold electrodes. These microtubules were then used as biofunctionalized templates to direct the organization of functionalized nanocargo including single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. This biologically-mediated scheme for nanomaterials assembly has shown excellent promise as a foundation for developing new biohybrid approaches to nanoscale manufacturing.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
966594
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-7853
TRN: US200922%%255
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ADSORPTION; AFFINITY; CARBON; ELECTRODES; GOLD; MANUFACTURING; MICROTUBULES; MOTORS; NANOSTRUCTURES; NANOTUBES; PROTEINS; TRANSPORT; Protein Transport-physiology.; Microtubules; Nanostructures.

Citation Formats

Spoerke, Erik David, Bunker, Bruce Conrad, Orendorff, Christopher J., Bachand, George David, Hendricks, Judy K., and Matzke, Carolyn M.. Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/966594.
Spoerke, Erik David, Bunker, Bruce Conrad, Orendorff, Christopher J., Bachand, George David, Hendricks, Judy K., & Matzke, Carolyn M.. Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.. United States. doi:10.2172/966594.
Spoerke, Erik David, Bunker, Bruce Conrad, Orendorff, Christopher J., Bachand, George David, Hendricks, Judy K., and Matzke, Carolyn M.. Mon . "Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.". United States. doi:10.2172/966594. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/966594.
@article{osti_966594,
title = {Active assembly for large-scale manufacturing of integrated nanostructures.},
author = {Spoerke, Erik David and Bunker, Bruce Conrad and Orendorff, Christopher J. and Bachand, George David and Hendricks, Judy K. and Matzke, Carolyn M.},
abstractNote = {Microtubules and motor proteins are protein-based biological agents that work cooperatively to facilitate the organization and transport of nanomaterials within living organisms. This report describes the application of these biological agents as tools in a novel, interdisciplinary scheme for assembling integrated nanostructures. Specifically, selective chemistries were used to direct the favorable adsorption of active motor proteins onto lithographically-defined gold electrodes. Taking advantage of the specific affinity these motor proteins have for microtubules, the motor proteins were used to capture polymerized microtubules out of suspension to form dense patterns of microtubules and microtubule bridges between gold electrodes. These microtubules were then used as biofunctionalized templates to direct the organization of functionalized nanocargo including single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. This biologically-mediated scheme for nanomaterials assembly has shown excellent promise as a foundation for developing new biohybrid approaches to nanoscale manufacturing.},
doi = {10.2172/966594},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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