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Title: Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system

Abstract

A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustainmore » California during extended dry periods.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
965771
Report Number(s):
LBNL-2197E
Journal ID: ISSN 1093-474X; JAWRAO; TRN: US200919%%720
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: August 2009; Journal ID: ISSN 1093-474X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; AQUIFERS; CALIFORNIA; DRAINAGE; DROUGHTS; GROUND WATER; INSURANCE; LAND USE; STORAGE; SURFACE WATERS; WATER REQUIREMENTS; WATER RESOURCES; WATER SUPPLY; WATER TABLES

Citation Formats

Miller, N.L., Dale, L.L., Brush, C., Vicuna, S., Kadir, T.N., Dogrul, E.C., and Chung, F.I. Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2009.00329.x.
Miller, N.L., Dale, L.L., Brush, C., Vicuna, S., Kadir, T.N., Dogrul, E.C., & Chung, F.I. Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2009.00329.x.
Miller, N.L., Dale, L.L., Brush, C., Vicuna, S., Kadir, T.N., Dogrul, E.C., and Chung, F.I. Fri . "Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1752-1688.2009.00329.x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/965771.
@article{osti_965771,
title = {Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system},
author = {Miller, N.L. and Dale, L.L. and Brush, C. and Vicuna, S. and Kadir, T.N. and Dogrul, E.C. and Chung, F.I.},
abstractNote = {A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustain California during extended dry periods.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1752-1688.2009.00329.x},
journal = {Journal of the American Water Resources Association},
issn = {1093-474X},
number = 4,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {5}
}