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Title: Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption

Abstract

This is a letter report summarizing the energy analysis of slab insulation requirements which are no longer in IECC 2006 for Montana climate zone. Based on energy analysis using Equest, we calculated energy consumption and annual energy cost for various insulation configurations. This information will be used by the Montana Energy office during the upcoming code hearings.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
965606
Report Number(s):
PNNL-16523
BT0703000; TRN: US200922%%340
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CLIMATES; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; ENERGY ANALYSIS; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; MONTANA; BUILDINGS; FOUNDATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION; BUILDING CODES

Citation Formats

Gowri, Krishnan. Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/965606.
Gowri, Krishnan. Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption. United States. doi:10.2172/965606.
Gowri, Krishnan. Tue . "Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption". United States. doi:10.2172/965606. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/965606.
@article{osti_965606,
title = {Montana Slab Edge Insulation Analysis for IECC 2006 Adoption},
author = {Gowri, Krishnan},
abstractNote = {This is a letter report summarizing the energy analysis of slab insulation requirements which are no longer in IECC 2006 for Montana climate zone. Based on energy analysis using Equest, we calculated energy consumption and annual energy cost for various insulation configurations. This information will be used by the Montana Energy office during the upcoming code hearings.},
doi = {10.2172/965606},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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