skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Rapid Mapping of Energy Dissipation Processes on the Nanoscale: The Band Excitation Method in Scanning Probe Microscopy

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
965292
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nanotechnology; Journal Volume: 43
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jesse, Stephen, Kalinin, Sergei V, Proksch, Roger, Baddorf, Arthur P, and Rodriguez, Brian J. Rapid Mapping of Energy Dissipation Processes on the Nanoscale: The Band Excitation Method in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/43/435503.
Jesse, Stephen, Kalinin, Sergei V, Proksch, Roger, Baddorf, Arthur P, & Rodriguez, Brian J. Rapid Mapping of Energy Dissipation Processes on the Nanoscale: The Band Excitation Method in Scanning Probe Microscopy. United States. doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/43/435503.
Jesse, Stephen, Kalinin, Sergei V, Proksch, Roger, Baddorf, Arthur P, and Rodriguez, Brian J. Mon . "Rapid Mapping of Energy Dissipation Processes on the Nanoscale: The Band Excitation Method in Scanning Probe Microscopy". United States. doi:10.1088/0957-4484/18/43/435503.
@article{osti_965292,
title = {Rapid Mapping of Energy Dissipation Processes on the Nanoscale: The Band Excitation Method in Scanning Probe Microscopy},
author = {Jesse, Stephen and Kalinin, Sergei V and Proksch, Roger and Baddorf, Arthur P and Rodriguez, Brian J},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1088/0957-4484/18/43/435503},
journal = {Nanotechnology},
number = ,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Understanding of local mechanisms for temperature-induced phase transitions in polymers requires quantitative measurements of thermomechanical behavior, including glass transition and melting temperatures as well as temperature dependent elastic and loss moduli and thermal expansion coefficients in nanoscale volumes. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing local thermal phase transitions based on the combination of thermal field confinement by a heated SPM probe and multi-frequency thermo-mechanical detection. The local measurement of the glass transition temperature is demonstrated and the detection limits are established.
  • In three decades since Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) methods have entered scientific arena, they have become one of the main tool of nanoscale science and technology by offering the capability for imaging topography, magnetic, electrical, and mechanical properties on the nanometer scale. The vast majority of force-based SPM techniques to date are based on single-frequency sinusoidal excitation and detection. Here, we illustrate the intrinsic limitations of single-frequency detection that stem from the fundamental physics of dynamic systems. Consequently, many aspects of nanoscale materials functionality including quantitative mechanical, magnetic, and electrical measurements, probing dissipative interactions, to name a few remain unexplored.more » Band excitation is illustrated as a universal alternative to traditional single-frequency techniques that allows quantitative and reliable studies of dissipative and conservative phenomena, and can be universally applied to all ambient and liquid SPM methods.« less
  • Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information canmore » serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.« less
  • Energy dissipation associated with assisted tunneling processes in scanning tunneling microscopy is analyzed and compared with the normal tunnel current. We find that, for high voltages, greater than one volt, the tunneling processes associated with electron-hole pair excitation control the increase in temperature at the microscope's interface.