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Title: The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West

Abstract

Most planners working west of the 100th meridian are aware that federal lands make up a large portion of the lands in the western states. In fact, federal lands comprise nearly 49% of the area of the fourteen states that make up the WPR family. These lands are usually under the Department of Agriculture (USFS) and the Department of Interior (BLM and NPS), but the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Energy (DOE) are also federal stewards of western lands. These federal military and energy installations play an important role in local and regional western communities and economies. They also play an important role in regional ecologies. It is a paradox that some of these sites have their share of legacy contamination from earlier missions, but they also include some of the most pristine remaining western ecosystems. In some cases, the sites are located near or surrounded by encroaching urbanization, making them particularly valuable lands both for recreation and habitat preservation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
964952
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-08-05021; LA-UR-08-5021
TRN: US200919%%388
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Western Planner Annual Conference ; August 7, 2008 ; Cheyenne, Wyoming
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; COMMUNITIES; CONTAMINATION; ECOSYSTEMS; HABITAT; PRESERVATION; US DOI

Citation Formats

Pava, Daniel S. The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Pava, Daniel S. The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West. United States.
Pava, Daniel S. Tue . "The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/964952.
@article{osti_964952,
title = {The paradox of federal energy and defense installations in the West},
author = {Pava, Daniel S},
abstractNote = {Most planners working west of the 100th meridian are aware that federal lands make up a large portion of the lands in the western states. In fact, federal lands comprise nearly 49% of the area of the fourteen states that make up the WPR family. These lands are usually under the Department of Agriculture (USFS) and the Department of Interior (BLM and NPS), but the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Energy (DOE) are also federal stewards of western lands. These federal military and energy installations play an important role in local and regional western communities and economies. They also play an important role in regional ecologies. It is a paradox that some of these sites have their share of legacy contamination from earlier missions, but they also include some of the most pristine remaining western ecosystems. In some cases, the sites are located near or surrounded by encroaching urbanization, making them particularly valuable lands both for recreation and habitat preservation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2008},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2008}
}

Conference:
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