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Title: Direct growth of dense, pristine metal nanoplates on semiconductor substrates.

Abstract

Shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanostructures has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because variation in morphologies of nanoparticles provides an effective means to fine tailor their properties.Various solution-phase chemical reactions have achieved great success in preparing metal nanoplates with the assistance of surfactant molecules,for instance,polymeric chains (e.g.,polyvinyl pyrrolidone) or PVP, polyamine), micellar assemblies (e.g.,cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or CTAB, di(2-ethyl-hexyl) sulfosuccinate or AOT), coordinating ligands,biological reagents, etc.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
963629
Report Number(s):
ANL/CNM/JA-59967
Journal ID: ISSN 0897-4756; CMATEX; TRN: US200918%%3
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chem. Mater.; Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SUBSTRATES; METALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; CRYSTAL GROWTH

Citation Formats

Sun, Y., and Center for Nanoscale Materials. Direct growth of dense, pristine metal nanoplates on semiconductor substrates.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/cm7022407.
Sun, Y., & Center for Nanoscale Materials. Direct growth of dense, pristine metal nanoplates on semiconductor substrates.. United States. doi:10.1021/cm7022407.
Sun, Y., and Center for Nanoscale Materials. Mon . "Direct growth of dense, pristine metal nanoplates on semiconductor substrates.". United States. doi:10.1021/cm7022407.
@article{osti_963629,
title = {Direct growth of dense, pristine metal nanoplates on semiconductor substrates.},
author = {Sun, Y. and Center for Nanoscale Materials},
abstractNote = {Shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanostructures has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because variation in morphologies of nanoparticles provides an effective means to fine tailor their properties.Various solution-phase chemical reactions have achieved great success in preparing metal nanoplates with the assistance of surfactant molecules,for instance,polymeric chains (e.g.,polyvinyl pyrrolidone) or PVP, polyamine), micellar assemblies (e.g.,cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or CTAB, di(2-ethyl-hexyl) sulfosuccinate or AOT), coordinating ligands,biological reagents, etc.},
doi = {10.1021/cm7022407},
journal = {Chem. Mater.},
number = 2007,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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