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Title: EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A

Abstract

The overall objective of this project was to develop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) control strategies using fast-response Particulate Matter (PM) sensors and NOx sensors to improve the quality of particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel engines. This project initially comprised three phases: (1) Phase IA - sensor requirements to meet PM sensor specifications, NOx sensor assessment, and initial model development for EGR control; (2) Phase IB - continue development on PM and NOx sensors, integrate the sensor signals into the control simulations, and finalize model development for control strategies; and (3) Phase II - validation testing of the control strategies. Only Phase 1A was funded by DOE and executed by Honeywell. The major objectives of Phase 1A of the project included: (1) Sensor validation and operation of fast-response PM and NOx sensors; (2) Control system modeling of low-pressure EGR controls, development of control strategies, and initial evaluation of these models and strategies for EGR control in diesel engines; (3) Sensor testing to understand applicability of fast-response PM sensors in determining loading rates of the particle trap; and (4) Model validation and sensor testing under steady-state and transient operational conditions of actual engines. In particular, specific objectives included demonstration of: (1)more » A PM sensor response time constant (T10 - T90) of better than 100 milliseconds (msec); (2) The ability to detect PM at concentrations from 0.2 to 2 Bosch smoke number (BSN) or equivalent; (3) PM sensor accuracy to within 20% BSN over the entire range of operation; and (4) PM sensor repeatability to within 10% over the PM entire sensor range equivalent to a BSN of 0.2 to 2.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Honeywell International Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
963419
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-05NT42482
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ACCURACY; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DIESEL ENGINES; ENGINES; EVALUATION; LOADING RATE; PARTICULATES; SIMULATION; SPECIFICATIONS; TESTING; TRANSIENTS; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Gravel, Roland, Conley, Jason, and Kittelson, David. EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/963419.
Gravel, Roland, Conley, Jason, & Kittelson, David. EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A. United States. doi:10.2172/963419.
Gravel, Roland, Conley, Jason, and Kittelson, David. Tue . "EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A". United States. doi:10.2172/963419. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/963419.
@article{osti_963419,
title = {EGR Control for Emisson Reduction Using Fast Response Sensors - Phase 1A},
author = {Gravel, Roland and Conley, Jason and Kittelson, David},
abstractNote = {The overall objective of this project was to develop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) control strategies using fast-response Particulate Matter (PM) sensors and NOx sensors to improve the quality of particulate and gaseous emissions from diesel engines. This project initially comprised three phases: (1) Phase IA - sensor requirements to meet PM sensor specifications, NOx sensor assessment, and initial model development for EGR control; (2) Phase IB - continue development on PM and NOx sensors, integrate the sensor signals into the control simulations, and finalize model development for control strategies; and (3) Phase II - validation testing of the control strategies. Only Phase 1A was funded by DOE and executed by Honeywell. The major objectives of Phase 1A of the project included: (1) Sensor validation and operation of fast-response PM and NOx sensors; (2) Control system modeling of low-pressure EGR controls, development of control strategies, and initial evaluation of these models and strategies for EGR control in diesel engines; (3) Sensor testing to understand applicability of fast-response PM sensors in determining loading rates of the particle trap; and (4) Model validation and sensor testing under steady-state and transient operational conditions of actual engines. In particular, specific objectives included demonstration of: (1) A PM sensor response time constant (T10 - T90) of better than 100 milliseconds (msec); (2) The ability to detect PM at concentrations from 0.2 to 2 Bosch smoke number (BSN) or equivalent; (3) PM sensor accuracy to within 20% BSN over the entire range of operation; and (4) PM sensor repeatability to within 10% over the PM entire sensor range equivalent to a BSN of 0.2 to 2.},
doi = {10.2172/963419},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {9}
}