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Title: Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy

Abstract

Supernova experiments to characterize dark energy require a well designed low redshift program; we consider this for both ongoing/near term (e.g. Supernova Legacy Survey) and comprehensive future (e.g., SNAP) experiments. The derived criteria are: a supernova sample centered near z=0.05 comprising 150-500 (in the former case) and 300-900 (in the latter case) well measured supernovae. Low redshift Type Ia supernovae play two important roles for cosmological use of the supernova distance-redshift relation: as an anchor for the Hubble diagram and as an indicator of possible systematics. An innate degeneracy in cosmological distances implies that 300 nearby supernovae nearly saturate their cosmological leverage for the first use, and their optimum central redshift is z=0.05. This conclusion is strengthened upon including velocity flow and magnitude offset systematics. Limiting cosmological parameter bias due to supernova population drift (evolution) systematics plausibly increases the requirement for the second use to less than about 900 supernovae.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Physics Division
OSTI Identifier:
962960
Report Number(s):
LBNL-61881
Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998; PRVDAQ; TRN: US0902981
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review D; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 28 November 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72; SUPERNOVAE; VELOCITY; PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Miller, Jeanne M, and Linder, E.V. Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Miller, Jeanne M, & Linder, E.V. Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy. United States.
Miller, Jeanne M, and Linder, E.V. Tue . "Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/962960.
@article{osti_962960,
title = {Importance of Supernovae at z<0.1 for Probing Dark Energy},
author = {Miller, Jeanne M and Linder, E.V.},
abstractNote = {Supernova experiments to characterize dark energy require a well designed low redshift program; we consider this for both ongoing/near term (e.g. Supernova Legacy Survey) and comprehensive future (e.g., SNAP) experiments. The derived criteria are: a supernova sample centered near z=0.05 comprising 150-500 (in the former case) and 300-900 (in the latter case) well measured supernovae. Low redshift Type Ia supernovae play two important roles for cosmological use of the supernova distance-redshift relation: as an anchor for the Hubble diagram and as an indicator of possible systematics. An innate degeneracy in cosmological distances implies that 300 nearby supernovae nearly saturate their cosmological leverage for the first use, and their optimum central redshift is z=0.05. This conclusion is strengthened upon including velocity flow and magnitude offset systematics. Limiting cosmological parameter bias due to supernova population drift (evolution) systematics plausibly increases the requirement for the second use to less than about 900 supernovae.},
doi = {},
journal = {Physical Review D},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Feb 20 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Supernova experiments to characterize dark energy require a well designed low redshift program; we consider this for both ongoing/near term (e.g. Supernova Legacy Survey) and comprehensive future (e.g. SNAP) experiments. The derived criteria are: a supernova sample centered near z{approx_equal}0.05 comprising 150-500 (in the former case) and 300-900 (in the latter case) well measured supernovae. Low redshift Type Ia supernovae play two important roles for cosmological use of the supernova distance-redshift relation: as an anchor for the Hubble diagram and as an indicator of possible systematics. An innate degeneracy in cosmological distances implies that 300 nearby supernovae nearly saturate theirmore » cosmological leverage for the first use, and their optimum central redshift is z{approx_equal}0.05. This conclusion is strengthened upon including velocity flow and magnitude offset systematics. Limiting cosmological parameter bias due to supernova population drift (evolution) systematics plausibly increases the requirement for the second use to less than about 900 supernovae.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • We present a revised interpretation of recent analysis of supernovae data. We evaluate the effect of the priors on the extraction of the dark energy equation of state. We find that the conclusions depend strongly on the {omega}{sub M} prior value and on its uncertainty and show that a biased fitting procedure applied on non concordant simulated data can converge to the 'concordance model'. Relaxing the prior on {omega}{sub M} points to other sets of solutions, which are not excluded by observational data.
  • We discuss the possibility of identifying anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous cosmological models using type Ia supernova data. A search for correlations in current type Ia peak magnitudes over a large range of angular scales yields a null result. However, the same analysis limited to supernovae at low redshift shows a feeble anticorrelation at the 2{sigma} level at angular scales {theta} Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign . Upcoming data from, e.g., the SNLS (Supernova Legacy Survey) and the SDSS-II (SDSS: Sloan Digital Sky Survey) supernova searches will improve our limits on the size of-or possibly detect-possible correlations also at high redshift at the permore » cent level in the near future. With data from the proposed SNAP (SuperNova Acceleration Probe) satellite, we will be able to detect the induced correlations from gravitational lensing on type Ia peak magnitudes on scales less than a degree.« less