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Title: Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

Abstract

Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA roadmap well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm² @ 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm² for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm² in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10 -2/cm² level onmore » the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP)
OSTI Identifier:
9623
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-133645
Journal ID: ISSN 0277-786X; ON: DE00009623
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-Eng-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 3676; Conference: 24th Annual International Symposium on Microlithography, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, Santa Clara, CA, March 14-19, 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation; Masking; Defects; Silicon; Fabrication

Citation Formats

Burkhart, S C, Cerjarn, C, Kearney, P, Mirkarimi, P, Walton, C, and Ray-Chaudhuri, A. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1117/12.351130.
Burkhart, S C, Cerjarn, C, Kearney, P, Mirkarimi, P, Walton, C, & Ray-Chaudhuri, A. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography. United States. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.351130
Burkhart, S C, Cerjarn, C, Kearney, P, Mirkarimi, P, Walton, C, and Ray-Chaudhuri, A. Thu . "Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography". United States. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.351130. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9623.
@article{osti_9623,
title = {Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography},
author = {Burkhart, S C and Cerjarn, C and Kearney, P and Mirkarimi, P and Walton, C and Ray-Chaudhuri, A},
abstractNote = {Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA roadmap well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm² @ 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm² for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm² in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10-2/cm² level on the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling.},
doi = {10.1117/12.351130},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/9623}, journal = {},
issn = {0277-786X},
number = ,
volume = 3676,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {3}
}

Conference:
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