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Title: Advanced robot locomotion.

Abstract

This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
961653
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-1466
TRN: US200920%%195
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; DESIGN; ROBOTS; LEGS; TRANSPORT; MOTION; SIMULATION; STABILITY; CONTROL SYSTEMS; Mobile robots; Robots-Motion.

Citation Formats

Neely, Jason C., Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater, Byrne, Raymond Harry, Feddema, John Todd, Spletzer, Barry Louis, Rose, Scott E., Novick, David Keith, Wilson, David Gerald, and Buerger, Stephen P.. Advanced robot locomotion.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/961653.
Neely, Jason C., Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater, Byrne, Raymond Harry, Feddema, John Todd, Spletzer, Barry Louis, Rose, Scott E., Novick, David Keith, Wilson, David Gerald, & Buerger, Stephen P.. Advanced robot locomotion.. United States. doi:10.2172/961653.
Neely, Jason C., Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater, Byrne, Raymond Harry, Feddema, John Todd, Spletzer, Barry Louis, Rose, Scott E., Novick, David Keith, Wilson, David Gerald, and Buerger, Stephen P.. Mon . "Advanced robot locomotion.". United States. doi:10.2172/961653. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/961653.
@article{osti_961653,
title = {Advanced robot locomotion.},
author = {Neely, Jason C. and Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater and Byrne, Raymond Harry and Feddema, John Todd and Spletzer, Barry Louis and Rose, Scott E. and Novick, David Keith and Wilson, David Gerald and Buerger, Stephen P.},
abstractNote = {This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.},
doi = {10.2172/961653},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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