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Title: Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method

Abstract

The analysis of impurities in uranium matrices is performed in a variety of fields, e.g. for quality control in the production stream converting uranium ores to fuels, as element signatures in nuclear forensics and safeguards, and for non-proliferation control. We have investigated the capabilities of time-of-flight ICP-MS for the analysis of impurities in uranium matrices using a matrix-matched method. The method was applied to the New Brunswick Laboratory CRM 124(1-7) series. For the seven certified reference materials, an overall precision and accuracy of approximately 5% and 14%, respectively, were obtained for 18 analyzed elements.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
961552
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry; Journal Volume: 274; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Uranium; trace elements; impurities; matrix-matched; matrix-matching; time-of-flight ICP-MS; nuclear forensic; nuclear safeguard

Citation Formats

Buerger, Stefan, Riciputi, Lee R, and Bostick, Debra A. Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s10967-006-6930-0.
Buerger, Stefan, Riciputi, Lee R, & Bostick, Debra A. Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method. United States. doi:10.1007/s10967-006-6930-0.
Buerger, Stefan, Riciputi, Lee R, and Bostick, Debra A. Mon . "Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method". United States. doi:10.1007/s10967-006-6930-0.
@article{osti_961552,
title = {Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method},
author = {Buerger, Stefan and Riciputi, Lee R and Bostick, Debra A},
abstractNote = {The analysis of impurities in uranium matrices is performed in a variety of fields, e.g. for quality control in the production stream converting uranium ores to fuels, as element signatures in nuclear forensics and safeguards, and for non-proliferation control. We have investigated the capabilities of time-of-flight ICP-MS for the analysis of impurities in uranium matrices using a matrix-matched method. The method was applied to the New Brunswick Laboratory CRM 124(1-7) series. For the seven certified reference materials, an overall precision and accuracy of approximately 5% and 14%, respectively, were obtained for 18 analyzed elements.},
doi = {10.1007/s10967-006-6930-0},
journal = {Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry},
number = 3,
volume = 274,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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