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Title: Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms

Abstract

Hydrological changes, particularly alterations in water table level, may largely overshadow the more direct effects of global temperature increase upon carbon cycling in arctic and subarctic wetlands. Frozen cores (n=40) of intact soils and vegetation were collected from a bog near Fairbanks, Alaska, and fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and Co in response to water table variation were studied under controlled conditions in the Duke University phytotron. Core microcosms thawed to a 20-cm depth over 30 days under a 20 hour photoperiod with a day/night temperature regime of 20/10{degrees}C. After 30 days the water table in 20 microcosms was decreased from the soil surface to -15 cm and maintained at the soil surface in 20 control cores. Outward fluxes of CO{sub 2} (9-16 g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) and CO (3-4 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) were greatest during early thaw and decreased to near zero for both gases before the water table treatment started. Lower water table tripled CO{sub 2} flux to the atmosphere when compared with control cores. Carbon monoxide was emitted at low rates from high water table cores and consumed by low water table cores. Methane fluxes were low (<1 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) in all coresmore » during thaw. High water table cores increased CH{sub 4} flux to 8-9 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1} over 70 days and remained high relative to the low water table cores (<0.74 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}). Although drying of wetland taiga soils may decrease CH{sub 4} emissions to the atmosphere, the associated increase in CO{sub 2} due to aerobic respiration will likely increase the global warming potential of gas emissions from these soils. 43 refs., 4 figs.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Alaska, Anchorage, AK (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
96050
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Sep 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WETLANDS; MICROCOSMS; WATER TABLES; ARCTIC REGIONS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; CARBON CYCLE; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON MONOXIDE; METHANE; SOILS

Citation Formats

Funk, D.W., Pullmann, E.R., and Peterson, K.M. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1029/94GB01229.
Funk, D.W., Pullmann, E.R., & Peterson, K.M. Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms. United States. doi:10.1029/94GB01229.
Funk, D.W., Pullmann, E.R., and Peterson, K.M. Thu . "Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms". United States. doi:10.1029/94GB01229.
@article{osti_96050,
title = {Influence of water table on carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane fluxes from taiga bog microcosms},
author = {Funk, D.W. and Pullmann, E.R. and Peterson, K.M.},
abstractNote = {Hydrological changes, particularly alterations in water table level, may largely overshadow the more direct effects of global temperature increase upon carbon cycling in arctic and subarctic wetlands. Frozen cores (n=40) of intact soils and vegetation were collected from a bog near Fairbanks, Alaska, and fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and Co in response to water table variation were studied under controlled conditions in the Duke University phytotron. Core microcosms thawed to a 20-cm depth over 30 days under a 20 hour photoperiod with a day/night temperature regime of 20/10{degrees}C. After 30 days the water table in 20 microcosms was decreased from the soil surface to -15 cm and maintained at the soil surface in 20 control cores. Outward fluxes of CO{sub 2} (9-16 g m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) and CO (3-4 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) were greatest during early thaw and decreased to near zero for both gases before the water table treatment started. Lower water table tripled CO{sub 2} flux to the atmosphere when compared with control cores. Carbon monoxide was emitted at low rates from high water table cores and consumed by low water table cores. Methane fluxes were low (<1 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}) in all cores during thaw. High water table cores increased CH{sub 4} flux to 8-9 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1} over 70 days and remained high relative to the low water table cores (<0.74 mg m{sup -2}d{sup -1}). Although drying of wetland taiga soils may decrease CH{sub 4} emissions to the atmosphere, the associated increase in CO{sub 2} due to aerobic respiration will likely increase the global warming potential of gas emissions from these soils. 43 refs., 4 figs.},
doi = {10.1029/94GB01229},
journal = {Global Biogeochemical Cycles},
number = 3,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {9}
}