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Title: NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

Abstract

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW ofmore » rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
960422
Report Number(s):
PPPL-4280
TRN: US0903070
DOE Contract Number:
DE-ACO2-76CHO3073
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; BEAM INJECTION; CYCLOTRONS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRONS; HEATING; HEATING SYSTEMS; IMPURITIES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MODE CONVERSION; MODIFICATIONS; PLASMA HEATING; RF SYSTEMS; ROTATION; STELLARATORS; VELOCITY; NCSX

Citation Formats

Kugel, H. W., Spong, D., Majeski, R., and Zarnstorff, M. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/960422.
Kugel, H. W., Spong, D., Majeski, R., & Zarnstorff, M. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods. United States. doi:10.2172/960422.
Kugel, H. W., Spong, D., Majeski, R., and Zarnstorff, M. 2008. "NCSX Plasma Heating Methods". United States. doi:10.2172/960422. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/960422.
@article{osti_960422,
title = {NCSX Plasma Heating Methods},
author = {Kugel, H. W. and Spong, D. and Majeski, R. and Zarnstorff, M.},
abstractNote = {The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.},
doi = {10.2172/960422},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3more » MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.« less
  • The successful operation of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) machine will require producing plasma configurations with good flux surfaces, with a minimum volume of the plasma lost to magnetic islands or stochastic regions. The project goal is to achieve good flux surfaces over 90% of the plasma volume. NCSX is a three period device designed to be operated with iota ranging from {approx}0.4 on axis to {approx}0.7 at the edge. The field errors of most concern are those that are resonant with 3/5 and 3/6 modes (for symmetry preserving field errors) and the 1/2 and 2/3 modes (for symmetrymore » breaking field errors). In addition to losses inherent in the physics configuration itself, there will be losses from field errors arising from coil construction and assembly errors. Some of these losses can be recovered through the use of trim coils or correction coils. The impact of coil tolerances on plasma surface quality is evaluated herein for the NCSX design. The methods used in this evaluation are discussed. The ability of the NCSX trim coils to correct for field errors is also examined. The results are used to set coils tolerances for the various coil systems.« less
  • The problem of volumetric heating of oil shales by electromagnetic methods and the effects of layering on heat conduction in oil shales are studied theoretically. This study includes both a detailed examination of heat conduction in composite media, and the development of a numerical model to describe the heating process. A new solution to a heat conduction equation in heterogenous materials is developed which includes both the effects of inclusions and contact resistance. The solution is presented in terms of the associated Green function and numerical results are displayed. A new solution to the heat conduction equation is presented formore » materials which consist of constituents whose thermal properties vary in a discontinuous manner. This solution is also presented in terms of a Green function and an iteration technique is developed to solve the related eigenfunction problem. Numerical results are exhibited for heat flow in layered materials. A two dimensional numerical model which describes electromagnetic heating of oil shales is developed which includes equations for temperature, pressure, saturations, chemical reactions, mass conservation, and source terms. The gases are all assumed to form one bulk species and the oil is assumed to remain in liquid form. The chemical reactions include pyrolysis of kerogen and char, release of bound water, coking, and decomposition of carbonates. Porosity and permeability are dynamic functions of the organic materials. Calibration of the model is accomplished by comparison of the model results with experimental data obtained by IITRI. Nonlinear relationships for viscosity, thermal properties, and source terms are used as inputs to the model. A finite difference approximation to the differential equations is derived and solved using Newton's iteration technique. Numerical results are included and a preliminary study of the optimization of the heating process is presented. 44 refs., 63 figs.« less